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NISO Plus 2021 has ended
NISO Plus 2021 is going to be a global virtual event, happening literally around the world February 22-25, 2021. Building on the wonderful response to NISO Plus 2020, we’re bringing the same quality of content and conversation to this born-digital event, with dozens of amazing speakers and keynotes from across the globe. Scheduled to maximize attendance from as many timezones as possible, there will be things for you to see and do around the clock if you wish...or, pick and choose to make the experience perfect for your interests.

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Monday, February 22
 

10:30am EST

Conference opening
Welcome to NISO Plus 2021! Join us for an overview of the conference and a welcome from our Conference Chair, our Executive Director, and members of our Planning Committee. 

Speakers
avatar for Todd Carpenter

Todd Carpenter

Executive Director, NISO
Wine, food, wine, Standards, running, wine, food, wine.http://orcid.org/0000-0002-8320-0491
avatar for Jason Griffey

Jason Griffey

Director of Strategic Initiatives, NISO
Jason Griffey is the Director of Strategic Initiatives at NISO, where he works to identify new areas of the information ecosystem where standards expertise is useful and needed, and leads ongoing projects such as NISO’s participation in the Coalition for Seamless Access. Prior to joining NISO... Read More →


Monday February 22, 2021 10:30am - 11:00am EST
Plenary
  All Conference
  • Host Organization NISO

11:00am EST

Keynote: The day of the comet: what trustbusting means for digital manipulation
NISO Discourse Discussion for this session
https://discourse.niso.org/t/keynote-the-day-of-the-comet-what-trustbusting-means-for-digital-manipulation/71

Big Tech likes to boast about how good it is at manipulating us and oh,
they are! But the cover manipulation - the psychological tricks they
sell to advertisers and politicians - are thinly supported by the
evidence and rely on self-serving, internal research that is largely
indistinguishable from marketing puffery. On the other hand, there are
plenty of ways that Big Tech provably alters our behavior: Facebook
locks all your friends in its walled garden so you need a Facebook
account to talk to your friends. Apple locks apps in its walled garden
so you can't access apps that Apple doesn't like. Google pays billions
to make it the default search on every platform, so any time you ask a
question, they're the ones giving you an answer.

All of this manipulation doesn't require psychological or technological
tricks - all it needs is monopoly, and for the first time in 40 years,
lawmakers are getting serious about fighting monopolies.

Using anti-monopoly laws to break Big Tech's power may sound like a win:
but if it turns out that Big Tech's claims to psychological manipulation
mastery are true, then won't breaking Big Tech up just create dozens of
little, reckless firms that have access to these devastating
psychological weapons?

In other words: if Big Tech is a comet headed at our planet threatening
all life, then won't breaking it up turn it into a devastating meteor
shower that we can't hope to survive?


Speakers
avatar for Cory Doctorow

Cory Doctorow

Writer, n/a
Cory Doctorow (craphound.com) is a science fiction novelist, blogger and technology activist. He is the co-editor of the popular weblog Boing Boing (boingboing.net), and a contributor to many magazines, websites and newspapers. He is a special consultant to the Electronic Frontier... Read More →


Monday February 22, 2021 11:00am - 11:50am EST
Plenary
  All Conference
  • Host Organization NISO

12:00pm EST

Accessibility and ebooks - strategies for ensuring it is done well
NISO Discourse Discussion for this session
https://discourse.niso.org/t/accessibility-and-ebooks-strategies-for-ensuring-it-is-done-well/75

Ebooks offer enormous accessibility opportunities for print-disabled individuals, from the quality of the reading experience to the timely availability of content. These achievements are largely due to huge efforts in the areas of both open standards and modern software tools. However, due to the complex nature of the publishing and distribution supply chain, end users may still face challenges when they simply want to acquire and read an ebook. Our speakers will introduce what ebook accessibility is, who it benefits, what open standards to be aware of, how to check ebooks for accessibility, and how to ensure that accessible content is recognized as such in distribution channels.
They will also introduce the open source & non-profit initiatives which greatly ease the setup of an accessible publishing workflow, linking together publishers, distributors, ebooksellers, public libraries, universities and end users.
This session will allow participants and speakers to discuss how we can ensure that the whole ebook publishing and distribution supply chain is well aligned towards providing content to everybody, what best practices are required, and who needs to be involved.

Moderators
avatar for Clarissa West-White

Clarissa West-White

Reference Instructor/Research Librarian, Bethune Cookman University

Speakers
avatar for Marisa DeMeglio

Marisa DeMeglio

Software Developer, DAISY Consortium
Marisa DeMeglio is a software developer for the DAISY Consortium. She has spent the past two decades working in the field of accessibility and ebooks, with projects ranging from alternate interface design and desktop reading software, to production chain format converters, to systems... Read More →
avatar for Laurent Le Meur

Laurent Le Meur

CTO, EDRLab
Laurent Le Meur is CTO of the European Digital Reading Lab and President of the Readium Foundation. He has a Computer Science background and has been leading innovative software projects for the last 20 years. He's leading the work of EDRLab and Readium on open-source development... Read More →


Monday February 22, 2021 12:00pm - 1:15pm EST
Room 3
  Global Perspectives
  • Host Organization NISO

12:00pm EST

Linked data and the future of information sharing
NISO Discourse Discussion for this session
https://discourse.niso.org/t/linked-data-and-the-future-of-information-sharing/74

Research data are valuable contributions to the scientific record along with papers, software, methods, and more. Understanding their connections to the progress of science is important as we continue to address the complexities of our world. Journals that cite data, include ORCIDs for authors, and connect to funding identifiers, help to build the links we need to discover how our work is connected with others in new ways. Our two expert speakers will share their views on the current state of data as a linked research output, how it continues to be recognized for its value in the scientific community, what the future brings, and what is still needed to get us there.

Link to Shelley Stall's slides: http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.4521592

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Shelley Stall

Shelley Stall

Senior Director, Data Leadership, American Geophysical Union
Shelley Stall is the Senior Director for the American Geophysical Union’s Data Leadership Program. She works with AGU’s members, their organizations, and the broader research community to improve data and digital object practices with the ultimate goal of elevating how research... Read More →
avatar for Christian Herzog

Christian Herzog

CEO Dimensions, Digital Science / Dimensions
Christian Herzog is the Co-Founder and CEO of Dimensions and the Chief Portfolio Officer of Digital Science. He’s a medical doctor by training and has also studied economics. Christian worked at Elsevier as a VP in Product Management for SciVal. He joined Elsevier in 2010 when Elsevier... Read More →


Monday February 22, 2021 12:00pm - 1:15pm EST
Room 1
  NFAIS Futures
  • Host Organization NISO

12:00pm EST

Standards that support diversity, equity, and inclusion
NISO Discourse Discussion for this session
https://discourse.niso.org/t/standards-that-support-diversity-equity-and-inclusion/73

We're all familiar with the problems that occur when standards fail to take into account diversity — from seatbelts that don't protect women as well as they protect men, to buildings that are only accessible to those with full mobility. Information standards, likewise, fail if they aren't created by, for, and with the community that uses them. This session will look at some existing standards that support DEI, and the speakers will also discuss what more we need to do to ensure that future standards are as diverse, inclusive, and equitable as they must be to succeed.

Moderators
avatar for Hannah Heckner

Hannah Heckner

Product Strategist, Silverchair
Hannah Heckner has served as Product Strategist at Silverchair since the start of 2020. In this position she provides detailed product visioning, helps to prioritize and execute on the platform development plan, and oversees the Silverchair Universe program. She previously served... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Katharina Ruckstuhl

Katharina Ruckstuhl

Associate Dean Māori, Otago Business School, University of Otago
I am an Associate Dean Māori and Senior Research Fellow at the Otago Business School, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand. My role in the Business School focuses on strategic empowerment of Māori students and staff with a particular focus on entrepreneurship.  I am actively... Read More →
SH

Simon Holt

Publisher, Micro/Nanotechnologies and Reference Content Volume Strategy, Elsevier
Simon Holt is a Book Publisher at Elsevier, where he has worked since 2013. He is Chair of Elsevier Enabled, an employee group representing people with disabilities across the organization, and has worked to advocate for greater inclusion and diversity for all demographics across... Read More →
avatar for Trevor A Dawes

Trevor A Dawes

University of Delaware
Trevor A. Dawes has worked in the academic library sector for over 20 years developing and providing a range of service-enhancing training and professional development opportunities that positively impact library-wide projects and programs. Dawes also facilitates workshops on leadership... Read More →


Monday February 22, 2021 12:00pm - 1:15pm EST
Room 2
  NISO Now
  • Host Organization NISO

12:00pm EST

Humanities in the information ecosystem
NISO Discourse Discussion for this session
https://discourse.niso.org/t/humanities-in-the-information-ecosystem/72

Unlocking JSTOR & Portico for Text Analysis & Pedagogy 
Text analytics, or the process of deriving new information from pattern and trend analysis of the written word, is making a transformative impact in the social sciences and humanities. Sadly, there is a massive hurdle facing those eager to unleash its power: the coding skills and statistical knowledge that text mining requires can take years to develop; moreover, access rights to high quality datasets for text mining are often cost prohibitive and may include further license negotiations. Over the past several years, JSTOR’s Data for Research (DfR) has addressed some of these issues, providing metadata and full-text datasets for its archival content. In January, ITHAKA – the organizational home of JSTOR and Portico – announced a completely new platform that incorporates DfR’s features, as well as adding visualization tools and an integrated analytics lab for learning and teaching text analysis. At NISO Plus, key members of the ITHAKA team will describe the design of this new multifaceted platform and highlight how its components can intersect with the needs of librarians, publishers, educators, students, and faculty. The presenters will emphasize the platform’s hosted analytics lab, where librarians and faculty can create, adapt, and adopt text mining analysis code that works with publisher content for data science instructional sessions.
Collections as Data: From Digital Library to Open Datasets
Collections as Data “aims to encourage computational use of digitized and born digital collections” (https://collectionsasdata.github.io/statement/), but how do you get started developing a Collections as Data program, especially with existing staff and technology resources? The Digital Library Services department at the University of Utah will share their practical approach to Collections as Data, ranging from releasing oral history data for text mining to developing a metadata transcription project to create a new historical dataset of mining labor employment records. We will also discuss developing partnerships with digital humanists on campus and the potential uses of the collections we’ve released to the public. We will also show how analyzing digital collections with a digital humanities approach can provide new insights into potential new processes for descriptive metadata creation.
Public Humanities: Challenges and Opportunities
Directors of leading humanities associations and initiatives discuss the impact and the challenges of public humanities, as an idea and as a method of study. What is public humanities, and why is it important? What forms of scholarly and creative output does it encompass? How can it be recognized and supported at institutional, national, and international levels? How do humanities scholars engage with a broad, diverse audience? How might these encounters change the nature and course of humanities study?

Join Modern Language Association Executive Director Paula Krebs, University of Virginia President's Commission on Slavery and the University Chair Kirt von Daacke, and University of Illinois Chicago Engaged Humanities Initiative Director Ellen McClure for a roundtable discussion and lively Q&A.

Moderators
avatar for Maria Stanton

Maria Stanton

Director, Content Production, Atla

Speakers
avatar for Jeremy Myntti

Jeremy Myntti

Interim Associate Dean, University of Utah, Marriott Library
Marriott Library, University of Utah
avatar for Anna Neatrour

Anna Neatrour

Interim Head, Digital Library Services, University of Utah
Interested in digital humanities, collaborative digitization, digital public history, collections as data, digital libraries, metadata, and more!
KD

Ken DiFiore

Outreach Director, ITHAKA
Since 2005, Ken has been a Library Outreach Director at ITHAKA – the organizational home of JSTOR, Portico, Artstor, and Ithaka S&R. During his tenure, he has contributed to the business development, marketing, and adoption of innovative products and services. Ken holds an advance... Read More →
avatar for Paula Krebs

Paula Krebs

Executive Director, Modern Language Assn
I'm Executive Director of the MLA, the disciplinary association for language, literature, writing, and cultural studies researchers and faculty members. We have roughly 24,000 members in more than 100 countries. We publish the MLA International Bibliography, the research database... Read More →
RJ

Rachel J. Wittmann

Digital Curation Librarian, Marriott Library, University of Utah
AK

Amy Kirchhoff

TDM Business Manager, ITHAKA
EM

Ellen McClure

Director, Engaged Humanities Initiative-UIC
I'm a specialist in seventeenth-century France interested in religion, politics, and literature; I also direct the Mellon-funded Engaged Humanities Initiative at UIC. I'm very interested in how to increase student interest and engagement in the humanities, and how to connect the classroom... Read More →
avatar for Kirt von Daacke

Kirt von Daacke

Assistant Dean and Professor, University of Virginia


Monday February 22, 2021 12:00pm - 1:15pm EST
Room 4
  Track 4
  • Host Organization NISO

1:30pm EST

An introduction to NISO
NISO Discourse Discussion for this session
https://discourse.niso.org/t/an-introduction-to-niso/76

Join us for an introduction to all things NISO! Curious about our work? Want to learn more about current standards and other NISO projects? Join us for an introduction and to ask us questions.

Moderators
RR

Rhonda Ross

Assistant Director, Marketing Programs Management, CAS

Speakers
avatar for Nettie Lagace

Nettie Lagace

Associate Executive Director, NISO - National Information Standards Organization
Nettie Lagace is the Associate Executive Director at NISO, where she is responsible for facilitating the work of NISO's topic committees and development groups for standards and best practices, and working with the community to encourage broad adoption of this consensus work. Prior... Read More →
avatar for Todd Carpenter

Todd Carpenter

Executive Director, NISO
Wine, food, wine, Standards, running, wine, food, wine.http://orcid.org/0000-0002-8320-0491


Monday February 22, 2021 1:30pm - 2:30pm EST
Room 2

6:30pm EST

Jeopardy: NISO Edition - and networking
Join us for conversation and a virtual game of Jeopardy: NISO Edition before we dive back into the first sessions with our colleagues in Asia Pacific - sponsored by Figshare.

Speakers
avatar for Raymond Pun

Raymond Pun

Librarian, Hoover Institution Library & Archives
he/him.
avatar for Gabriela Mejias

Gabriela Mejias

Engagement Manager, ORCID
NISO Plus 2020 Scholarship Awardee


Monday February 22, 2021 6:30pm - 7:45pm EST
TBD

8:00pm EST

Research data: describing, sharing, protecting, saving
NISO Discourse Discussion for this session
https://discourse.niso.org/t/research-data-describing-sharing-protecting-saving/78

Standardising and aligning journal and funder data policies 
An increasing number of publishers and journals are implementing policies that require or recommend that published articles be accompanied by the underlying research data. These policies are an important part of the shift toward reproducible research and contribute to the availability of research data for reuse. However there is wide variation between policies that makes it challenging for journal editors to develop and support a data policy, difficult for researchers in understanding and complying, and complex for infrastructure providers and research support staff to assist with data policy compliance.

There is clear benefit in a more standardised approach to policies. This has been the goal of international efforts led by the Research Data Alliance (RDA) Data Policy Standardisation and Implementation Interest Group resulting in the publication - and subsequent adoption - of a research data policy Framework to help journal editors and publishers navigate the creation or enhancement of a research data policy. There are also significant gains to be made in aligning journal and funder data policies with a project underway to address this challenge. This presentation will be given by co-chairs of the RDA Policy Standardisation group.

The Mystery of the Data and Software Citations...Why They Don’t Link to our Papers and Credit their Authors. 
Scientific data and software are being recognized more and more as first-class research products, preserved in appropriate repositories, and cited in papers where they were utilized to provide transparency, support reproducibility, and give credit. Yet the mechanisms that give automated credit and attribution are not being initiated consistently, nor is the ability to link these research products in a machine readable way. Important elements for this to happen include the citation itself and the persistent identifier (e.g., Digital Object Identifier) that is registered to the research object. This session will explain the current processes and examine the issues along with recommendations being proposed to help researchers get automated credit and attribution and support linking across research objects.



Speakers
avatar for Shelley Stall

Shelley Stall

Senior Director, Data Leadership, American Geophysical Union
Shelley Stall is the Senior Director for the American Geophysical Union’s Data Leadership Program. She works with AGU’s members, their organizations, and the broader research community to improve data and digital object practices with the ultimate goal of elevating how research... Read More →
avatar for Patricia Feeney

Patricia Feeney

Head of Metadata, Crossref
avatar for Iain Hrynaszkiewicz

Iain Hrynaszkiewicz

Director, Open Research Solutions, PLOS
RF

Rosemary Farmer

Senior Director, Content Transformation, Wiley


Monday February 22, 2021 8:00pm - 9:15pm EST
Room 1
  NFAIS Futures
  • Host Organization NISO

8:00pm EST

Seamless Access and Federated Authentication: next steps
NISO Discourse Discussion for this session
https://discourse.niso.org/t/seamless-access-and-federated-authentication-next-steps/77

Join us for an update on the Seamless Access project (http://seamlessaccess.org) and a discussion of the issues surrounding the world of Federated Authentication.

Moderators
avatar for Jason Griffey

Jason Griffey

Director of Strategic Initiatives, NISO
Jason Griffey is the Director of Strategic Initiatives at NISO, where he works to identify new areas of the information ecosystem where standards expertise is useful and needed, and leads ongoing projects such as NISO’s participation in the Coalition for Seamless Access. Prior to joining NISO... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Heather Flanagan

Heather Flanagan

Program Director, SeamlessAccess


Monday February 22, 2021 8:00pm - 9:15pm EST
Room 2
  NISO Now
  • Host Organization NISO

9:30pm EST

Publishing with meaning: which vocabularies are you using to enhance discovery and description?
NISO Discourse Discussion for this session
https://discourse.niso.org/t/publishing-with-meaning-which-vocabularies-are-you-using-to-enhance-discovery-and-description/80

Publishing is the act of making data and information resources accessible to others. For effective and accurate scholarly communication developing shared vocabularies, terminologies and semantic assets are critical to the discovery and understanding of published resources, and help reduce ambiguity and increase interoperability. Many disciplines and organisations have local lists of vocabularies that serve multiple functions including enhancing discovery, annotation and description. With the globalisation of data and information resources, enabling a common understanding of any ‘concept’ used to describe or define a ‘thing’ in our world is becoming critical. There is a growing need to develop common vocabularies that can be used across broader communities and support harmonization of information both within and across disciplines and languages. But we also need to be able to communicate to users of any semantic asset, information about its sustainability, governance, authority, conditions of use, etc.


Moderators
avatar for Natasha Simons

Natasha Simons

Associate Director, Data & Services, Australian Research Data Commons
Natasha Simons has her head in the clouds - literally, technically and figuratively. She loves research data and making good stuff happen. As Associate Director, Data & Services, at the Australian Research Data Commons she is responsible for programs that support the development of... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Simon Cox

Simon Cox

Research Scientist, CSIRO
avatar for Lesley Wyborn

Lesley Wyborn

Honorary Professor, Australian National University


Monday February 22, 2021 9:30pm - 10:45pm EST
Room 1
  NFAIS Futures
  • Host Organization NISO

9:30pm EST

The values and challenges of the CRediT taxonomy
NISO Discourse Discussion for this session
https://discourse.niso.org/t/the-values-and-challenges-of-the-credit-taxonomy/79

The CRediT (Contributor Roles) taxonomy — already in use by a number of publishers and other organizations — is currently being formalized as an ANSI/NISO standard. It is valued by the community as a way of recognizing more of the many types of research contribution. But there are also still many challenges to be addressed, including the current focus on roles in the STEM publication process, which will be tackled in future phases. The speakers in this session will share their views on the current and future value of CRediT, how that can be maximized in future, and what challenges will need to be overcome for us to be successful.

Moderators
avatar for Todd Digby

Todd Digby

Chair, Library Technology Services, University of Florida
Todd Digby is the Chair of Library Technology Services at the University of Florida. In this position, Todd leads a service oriented department that researches, develops, optimizes and supports advanced library information systems and technology for the University of Florida Libraries... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Liz Allen

Liz Allen

Director of Strategic Initiatives, F1000, Taylor & Francis Group
Liz Allen is Director of Strategic Initiatives at F1000 Research and leads on shaping new initiatives and partnerships to foster open research publishing. Prior to joining F1000Research in 2015, she spent over a decade leading the Evaluation Team at the Wellcome Trust.Liz is a Visiting Senior Research Fellow in the Policy Institute at... Read More →
avatar for Richard Wynne

Richard Wynne

Founder, Rescognito
The founder and leader of rescognito a free service for recognizing and promoting good research citizenship. Rescognito is built on ORCIDs and allows organizations to reward contributors with ‘Cogs’, the currency of recognition in the research world. ESIP is working with Rescognito to recognize contributions to... Read More →
avatar for Alex Holcombe

Alex Holcombe

Professor, University of Sydney
A professor of psychology at the University of Sydney, in his laboratory Alex investigates visual perception and cognition. Outside the lab, for fifteen years Alex has worked on open access, research transparency, and improving reproducibility in academic roles with organizations... Read More →


Monday February 22, 2021 9:30pm - 10:45pm EST
Room 2
  NISO Now
  • Host Organization NISO
 
Tuesday, February 23
 

10:00am EST

Keynote: Connecting the World Through Local Indigenous Knowledge
NISO Discourse Discussion for this session
https://discourse.niso.org/t/keynote-connecting-the-world-through-local-indigenous-knowledge/81

Indigenous Knowledge affects all sectors of the global economy such as health, food and agriculture, architecture, music, etc...the list goes on and on. But this knowledge is going extinct because it has not been harnessed and preserved.

How should we as information personnel be treating this kind of knowledge? Can we document them? Can we apply standards to them? how do we treat such knowledge and harness them for global development

Speakers
avatar for Margaret Sraku-Lartey, PhD

Margaret Sraku-Lartey, PhD

Principal Librarian, CSIR-Forestry Research Institute of Ghana
Margaret is a chartered librarian with over 30 years’ experience in information management. She holds a PhD in Geography and Rural Development with specializations in Indigenous Knowledge and Climate Change Adaptation. Margaret has a passion for local Indigenous People and her interest... Read More →


Tuesday February 23, 2021 10:00am - 10:50am EST
Plenary
  All Conference
  • Host Organization NISO

11:00am EST

Innovative forms of scholarly publishing
NISO Discourse Discussion for this session
https://discourse.niso.org/t/innovative-forms-of-scholarly-publishing/83

Digitalization is enabling the creation of all sorts of new and innvoative forms of scholarly publishing. In this
session, experts from three very different publishing organizations will share examples and discuss what they think the future holds.

Moderators
avatar for Robert Boissy

Robert Boissy

Director, Account Development, Springer Nature
I have had various roles in scholarly publishing since 2003, and fifteen years as a subscription agent before that. I have library degrees from the University at Albany and Syracuse University. I like to talk about cooperative marketing projects between libraries and publishers... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Kath Burton

Kath Burton

Portfolio Development - Humanities, Routledge, Taylor & Francis
I have held a number of scholarly communication roles from managing editor to director, squarely situated within the humanities and social sciences over the past 15 years. Now working in portfolio development for Routledge, Taylor & Francis and co-convener of the Publishing and Publicly... Read More →
avatar for Stephanie Dawson

Stephanie Dawson

CEO, ScienceOpen
Content in context is our goal at ScienceOpen. We provide publishing and metadata services embedded within an interactive discovery environment with a focus on preprints, open peer review, and community curation.
avatar for Sara Jo Cohen

Sara Jo Cohen

Senior Acquiring Editor, University of Michigan Press
I am Senior Acquiring Editor for American studies, media studies, and music studies at University of Michigan Press.   I interested in open access publishing, digital publishing, and pushing the boundaries of what "counts" as scholarship.   I've been at Michigan for two years now... Read More →


Tuesday February 23, 2021 11:00am - 12:15pm EST
Room 3
  Global Perspectives
  • Host Organization NISO

11:00am EST

The future of intellectual property: Al and machine learning
NISO Discourse Discussion for this session
https://discourse.niso.org/t/the-future-of-intellectual-property-al-and-machine-learning/82

What does AI and machine learning mean for the future of intellectual property? Hear views from two expert lawyers — representing a library and a publishing perspective — and then join the discussion afterwards to share your own views.

Moderators
avatar for Bohyun Kim

Bohyun Kim

CTO, URI
Bohyun Kim is the Chief Technology Officer and an Associate Professor at the University of Rhode Island Libraries. She is the author of three books, Moving Forward with Digital DisruptionUnderstanding Gamification, and Library Mobile Experience: Practices and User Expectati... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Nancy Sims

Nancy Sims

Copyright Program Librarian, University of Minnesota Libraries
Nancy Sims is a lawyerbrarian who is fascinated by copyright issues in modern life. She helps folks understand how copyright may affect their lives, and advocates policies and laws that enable wide public cultural participation.
avatar for Roy Kaufman

Roy Kaufman

Managing Director, Business Development, Copyright Clearance Center
Roy Kaufman is Managing Director of both Business Development and Government Relations for Copyright Clearance Center. Prior to CCC, Kaufman served as Legal Director, John Wiley and Sons, Inc. He is a member of, among other things, the Bar of the State of New York, the Author’s... Read More →


Tuesday February 23, 2021 11:00am - 12:15pm EST
Room 1
  NFAIS Futures
  • Host Organization NISO

11:00am EST

Solving problems with standards
NISO Discourse Discussion for this session
https://discourse.niso.org/t/solving-problems-with-standards/85

NISO Recommended Practices for Video and Audio Metadata
Although many metadata standards address video and audio assets to some extent, a clear, commonly understood, and widely used set of properties is lacking. This is particularly problematic when assets are interchanged between their producers, such as educators, researchers, and documentarians, and their recipients, such as aggregators, libraries, and archives.

The NISO Video and Audio Metadata Working Group (VAMD) was formed to address this problem. Composed of technologists, librarians, aggregators, and publishers, the working group collaborated to develop a set of metadata properties deemed generally useful for the interchange of media assets. This includes bibliographic properties used for identification and citation, semantic properties useful for search and discovery, technical properties specific to media assets, and administrative properties to facilitate transactions.

This model is not intended to employ or replace existing metadata standards and vocabularies. Instead, the VAMD terms are a set of recommended properties to be expressed in the appropriate metadata scheme for specific parties, serving as a hub to facilitate interchange between parties that use different metadata schemes.

This session will present the current state of media asset interchange, the use cases addressed, and the results of a comparison with nine existing related standards, such as MARC and PBCore.

Introducing the Software Citation: Giving Credit Where Credit is Due
Research is commonly intense and complicated. The work to analyze a hypothesis involves building on the discovery of others and contributing new ideas and approaches. Sometimes researchers use tools designed for their community that are licensed or open source, and sometimes they must develop their own software or workflow in order to achieve their objectives. This software (aka code, model) is an important research object that supports transparency and reproducibility of our research. Without the software, it can be much harder or impossible to fully understand how the resulting data were generated and to have faith in the conclusions presented in the paper.

In this session we will share (via slides) 1) the guidance developed by the FORCE11 Software Citation Implementation Working Group for authors, developers, and journals; 2) how it supports and aligns to efforts happening around JATS/JATS4R; and 3) ways for the community to evaluate how well software citations, and necessary availability statements are being provided by authors.


Subsetting the JATS DTD – So What?
As scholarly publishers transition from manual, PDF-based workflows to automated, XML-based workflows, they will find important advantages in subsetting the JATS (Journal Article Tag Suite) DTD.

JATS was designed as a descriptive, not a prescriptive, DTD, so it allows for different ways to capture the same content and information. While this was necessary to accommodate widely divergent journal styles and legacy content, the looseness of the DTD poses problems for people building tools to bring XML forward in more automated publishing workflows. For example, building an online XML editor that allows all 11 ways of associating authors and affiliations would be unnecessarily complex and expensive to develop and maintain.

Fortunately, the JATS DTD was also designed to be easily subsetted. Content analysts can narrow the variations that developers are required to build to, making automated systems cheaper to develop and more robust. A well-designed subset that considers industry initiatives such as JATS4R also aids in making XML content more machine-readable and thus more discoverable.

Moderators
GG

Greg Grazevich

Associate Director, Bibliographic Information Services, Modern Language Association of America
Gregory Grazevich is associate director of Bibliographic Information Services at the Modern Language Association of America and editor of the MLA International Bibliography. He joined the MLA in 1994 as a thesaurus editor after receiving an MA in Slavic and Baltic linguistics at the... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Daniel S. Katz

Daniel S. Katz

Chief Scientist, NCSA, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Dan is Chief Scientist at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) and Research Associate Professor in Computer Science, Electrical and Computer Engineering, and the School of Information Sciences (iSchool), at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. In past... Read More →
avatar for Melissa Harrison

Melissa Harrison

Head of Production Operations, eLife Sciences Organisation
Melissa Harrison, Head of Production Operations at eLife, has been working in journal STM publishing for over 20 years. Over this time she has embraced the electronic benefits of online publishing and the use of technology to speed up and improve the process. She is committed to open-access... Read More →
avatar for Charles O'Connor

Charles O'Connor

Business Systems Analyst, Aries Systems
XML-through journal production workflows
avatar for Bill Kasdorf

Bill Kasdorf

Principal, Kasdorf & Associates, LLC
Bill Kasdorf, kasdorf.bill@gmail.com, is Principal of Kasdorf & Associates, LLC, focusing on editorial and production workflows, XML/HTML/EPUB modeling and specification, standards and best practices, and accessibility. He is a founding partner of Publishing Technology Partners. Bill is the W3C Global Publishing Evangelist and is active in the W3C Publishing@W3C work. He co-chairs NISO’s Video & Audio Metadata Guidelines Working Group, is a member and Past President of SSP, and is also a member of BISG’s Workflow Working Group, IPTC, and the DAISY Co... Read More →
avatar for Erika Pastrana

Erika Pastrana

Editorial Director, Springer Nature
Erika is responsible for management and editorial direction of Nature journals in applied sciences and chemistry (including Nature Biotechnology, Nature Medicine, Nature Methods, Nature Chemistry and Nature Machine Intelligence). She is part of the senior management group at Nature... Read More →
avatar for Violaine Iglesias

Violaine Iglesias

CEO, Cofounder, Cadmore Media
I talk WAY to much about video and video metadata, but I have other interests, too!
avatar for Barbara Chen

Barbara Chen

Consultant, self
Barbara Chen has been in the information industry for her entire professional career. Soon after receiving her MLS, she joined the H.W. Wilson Company as an indexer. She subsequently developed her technological skills when computers were introduced into the company and she became... Read More →


Tuesday February 23, 2021 11:00am - 12:15pm EST
Room 2
  NISO Now
  • Host Organization NISO

11:00am EST

Access, authentication, and authorization
NISO Discourse Discussion for this session
https://discourse.niso.org/t/access-authentication-and-authorization/84

Need help understanding the connections between authentication, authorization, and access to resources in the ever-changing world of scholarly resources? Join us for an overview of emerging services (GetFTR, Seamless Access, and more), learn how they are connected (or not!), and get involved in the discussion on how sorting access can get us closer to meeting the patrons’ expectations for a personalized research experience. The session is an opportunity to expand your appreciation of the role your organization plays in the wider information ecosystem.  

Moderators
avatar for Janetta Waterhouse

Janetta Waterhouse

Director of Technical Services and Library Systems, University at Albany SUNY

Speakers
avatar for Lisa Janicke Hinchliffe

Lisa Janicke Hinchliffe

Professor/Coordinator for Information Literacy Services and Instruction in the University Library, UIUC
avatar for Ralph Youngen

Ralph Youngen

Sr. Director, Digital Strategy, ACS Publications
avatar for Vee Rogacheva

Vee Rogacheva

Service Design Lead, OpenAthens
Vee Rogacheva is the service design lead for OpenAthens. With a laser focus on the users, Rogacheva and her team remove barriers to knowledge for millions of learners and researchers. They build the world's most user-friendly access management experience for libraries and their p... Read More →


Tuesday February 23, 2021 11:00am - 12:15pm EST
Room 4
  Track 4
  • Host Organization NISO

12:30pm EST

What has 2020 taught us about the information ecosystem?
NISO Discourse Discussion for this session
https://discourse.niso.org/t/what-has-2020-taught-us-about-the-information-ecosystem-fragility-and-resilience/91

The impact of the COVID19 pandemic and the Black Lives Matter protests in 2020 were (and continue to be) felt all around the world — including the information world: the rapid shift to online learning; the dramatic increase in the use of digital resources; the challenges of working from home; budget and hiring cuts and freezes. Which of these changes — and more — will be permanent? What will the information community look like five or ten years from now? The lessons we learn will help us better understand the fragility or resilience of our organizations and structures, our processes and policies. This session includes perspectives from librarians, publishers, and vendors from around the world about what their experiences in 2020 have taught them.

Moderators
avatar for Jabin White

Jabin White

VP of Content Management, ITHAKA
Jabin White is Vice President of Content Management for ITHAKA, an organization committed to helping the academic community use digital technologies to preserve the scholarly record and to advance research and teaching in sustainable ways. ITHAKA provides several services to the academic... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Christopher Chan

Christopher Chan

Deputy University Librarian, Hong Kong Baptist University
I worked in Information Services at HKBU Library for over 12 years. Prior to that, I was a school librarian at two international schools in Hong Kong.In February 2021 I was appointed Deputy University Librarian. In this role I provide leadership and management for all of the Library's... Read More →
avatar for Sandy Hirsh

Sandy Hirsh

Associate Dean for Academics, San Jose State University
Dr. Sandra Hirsh is Associate Dean for Academics in the College of Professional and Global Education at San José State University. She previously served as Professor and Director of the School of Information at San José State University for ten years from 2010-2020. Prior to joining... Read More →
avatar for Mohamed Baessa

Mohamed Baessa

Manager, Preservation and Digital Services, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology
avatar for Peter Simon

Peter Simon

Vice President, Product Management, NewsBank, Inc
Peter Simon is Vice President, Product Management at NewsBank, inc. He directs the development of key products while working on numerous strategic initiatives important to the growth of the company.Simon began his career as an Editor at RR Bowker; progressed to Executive Vice President... Read More →
avatar for Clarissa West-White

Clarissa West-White

Reference Instructor/Research Librarian, Bethune Cookman University
avatar for C K Ramaiah

C K Ramaiah

Professor, University of Pondicherry
avatar for Oya Rieger

Oya Rieger

Senior Strategist, Ithaka S+R
avatar for Stephanie Dawson

Stephanie Dawson

CEO, ScienceOpen
Content in context is our goal at ScienceOpen. We provide publishing and metadata services embedded within an interactive discovery environment with a focus on preprints, open peer review, and community curation.


Tuesday February 23, 2021 12:30pm - 1:45pm EST
Room 3
  Global Perspectives
  • Host Organization NISO

12:30pm EST

Discoverability in an AI world
NISO Discourse Discussion for this session
https://discourse.niso.org/t/discoverability-in-an-ai-world/87

The information community is increasingly reliant on AI-driven search engines to enable our content to be discovered by users. Our speakers will highlight what this means for content creators, curators, and users alike — in terms of both challenges and opportunities for us all.

Andromeda Yelton will be speaking, while Christine Stohn and Karim Boughida will be available for questions during the discussion period.

Speakers
avatar for Christine Stohn

Christine Stohn

Dir Product Management, ProQuest (Ex Libris)
Christine Stohn is director of product management for discovery and delivery at Ex Libris. Christine has over 25 years of experience in the library and information industry, having worked on the content and data side before joining Ex Libris in 2001. In her current role Christine... Read More →
avatar for Andromeda Yelton

Andromeda Yelton

I'm a software engineer and librarian investigating humanistic applications of machine learning, and an adjunct faculty member at the San José State University iSchool, where I teach about AI. In the past, I've written code for the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society, the... Read More →

Moderators
avatar for Karim Boughida

Karim Boughida

Dean, Universities Libraries, URI


Tuesday February 23, 2021 12:30pm - 1:45pm EST
Room 1
  NFAIS Futures
  • Host Organization NISO

12:30pm EST

The business models of infrastructure support
NISO Discourse Discussion for this session
https://discourse.niso.org/t/the-business-models-of-infrastructure-support/86

How does the infrastructure that supports our community get funded, and by whom? How can we ensure its long-term sustainability — and, by extension, that of the research tools and services that depend on it? What does sustainability even mean? Our speakers share their perspectives on these and other important questions.

Moderators
avatar for Andrew Joseph

Andrew Joseph

Digital Publisher, Wits University Press
Andrew Joseph is the Digital Publisher at Wits University Press. His publishing experience has largely been in academic and reference publications, for most major European and US academic publishers – books, journals and digital products, archives, production workflows and business... Read More →

Speakers
PS

Patrick Sweeney

Political Director, EveryLibrary Institute
I am the former Administrative Librarian of the Sunnyvale (CA) Public Library and was Executive Director of EveryLibrary California, a statewide initiative to support library propositions.  I was awarded Library Journal’s “Movers and Shakers” award in 2015 for my library advocacy... Read More →
avatar for Ginny Hendricks

Ginny Hendricks

Community Director, Crossref
Since 2015, Ginny has been developing the member and community outreach team at Crossref encompassing outreach and education, user experience and support, and metadata strategy. She is the Instigator of the Metadata 2020 collaboration to advocate for richer, connected, reusable and... Read More →
avatar for Rebecca Ross

Rebecca Ross

Canadian Research Knowledge Network
Rebecca Ross is the Senior Director of Strategy and Engagement at the Canadian Research Knowledge Network. Prior to joining CRKN, Rebecca led the marketing department at Canadian Science Publishing, Canada’s largest not-for-profit science publisher. Rebecca’s works at the intersection... Read More →


Tuesday February 23, 2021 12:30pm - 1:45pm EST
Room 2
  NISO Now
  • Host Organization NISO

12:30pm EST

FAIR data principles and why they matter
NISO Discourse Discussion for this session
https://discourse.niso.org/t/fair-data-principles-and-why-they-matter/89

FAIREST of them all
Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, Reusable. We all think FAIR data is a “good thing” don’t we. Who could be against something that, once stated, is so blindingly obvious? If it’s not findable, and usable then why are we spending time, money and resources keeping it? And it’s a great acronym as well. FAIR. It “does what it says on the tin"". If you’ve got a good acronym you’re half way there when it comes to hearts and minds….

But I think FAIR doesn’t go far enough. There are major impact factors that need to be considered alongside FAIR. What about the costs involved in making information FAIR? Where does trust come in? What about the environmental impact?

Time for a new acronym that goes beyond simply “FAIR”.

What should that be? This talk will propose one possible extension to the concept..."

Leveraging FAIR Data Principles to Construct the CCC COVID Author Graph
A knowledge graph is an innovative and revealing visual exposition of data. Display of such data is a powerful way to explore connections and query relationships among different entities, but only if the underlying data is of high quality.

The global research community’s effort to fight COVID-19 has led to an explosive increase of manuscripts submitted to peer-reviewed journals. With this influx of submissions, publishers have recognized limitations in the existing methods for identifying appropriate peer reviewers to validate the accuracy, impact, and value of these manuscripts.

To address this challenge, CCC developed the COVID Author Graph, a knowledge graph highlighting peer review data focused on authors who have published in areas with special attention to coronaviruses, SARS, MERS, SARS-CoV-2, and COVID-19. This new approach helps publishers leverage data to aid in the accelerated identification of peer reviewers.

During this session, presenters will illustrate how the FAIR data principles –Findability, Accessibility, Interoperability, and Reuse of digital assets – served as a trusted foundation for building the COVID Author Graph. They will share key learnings with an emphasis on how reliable levels of data quality that FAIR principles make possible enable more sophisticated analysis and help organizations derive actionable business insights.

FAIR (meta)data - low-hanging fruit for scholarly publishers (Brian Cody)
Drawing on experience working with journal publishers to collect/enhance/format metadata, this session section overviews FAIR principles and shares concrete steps for beginning your FAIR journey.

Moderators
avatar for Stephanie Dawson

Stephanie Dawson

CEO, ScienceOpen
Content in context is our goal at ScienceOpen. We provide publishing and metadata services embedded within an interactive discovery environment with a focus on preprints, open peer review, and community curation.

Speakers
avatar for Brian Cody

Brian Cody

CEO and Co-Founder, Scholastica
avatar for Paul Stokes

Paul Stokes

Product Manager, Jisc
Paul has had a varied career in both the commercial sector and academia (and all points in-between). At present,  he leads on preservation for Jisc's Preservation service [Preservation | Jisc] where he is currently referred to as a "Product Manager". He is a director of the Digi... Read More →
avatar for Stephen Howe

Stephen Howe

Senior Product Manager, Copyright Clearance Center
Raised in a family of teachers, a former teacher himself, and a lifelong student, Stephen's goal is to help people learn. Stephen has spent his career working at the intersection of publishing, education, and technology, holding positions in sales, sales management, production, project... Read More →


Tuesday February 23, 2021 12:30pm - 1:45pm EST
Room 4
  Track 4
  • Host Organization NISO

2:00pm EST

NISO update
NISO Discourse Discussion for this session
https://discourse.niso.org/t/niso-an-update/90

NISO projects are numerous, diverse in output, coverage, and participation, and ACTIVE! This session will support presentations from a small selection of current efforts, all at different stages of their lifecycles. Following project presentations, we will move into breakout rooms for more direct project Q&A and discussions.

Manuscript Exchange Common Approach
Speakers: Tony Alves, Stephen Laverick

Content Platform Migrations
Speaker: Athena Hoeppner

KBART (Knowledge Bases and Related Tools)
Speakers: Stephanie Doellinger, Robert Heaton, Noah Levin, Andrée Rathemacher

Moderators
avatar for Peter Simon

Peter Simon

Vice President, Product Management, NewsBank, Inc
Peter Simon is Vice President, Product Management at NewsBank, inc. He directs the development of key products while working on numerous strategic initiatives important to the growth of the company.Simon began his career as an Editor at RR Bowker; progressed to Executive Vice President... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Stephen Laverick

Stephen Laverick

Green Fifteen Consultancy / Typefi
Stephen has over 20 years’ experience in scholarly publishing with time spent working in both the UK and China.Primarily focused on digital publishing solutions, during his time as Technical Director at The Charlesworth Group, Stephen was instrumental in overseeing the development... Read More →
avatar for Noah Levin

Noah Levin

Co-Chair NISO KBART Standing Committee, NISO KBART Standing Committee
Noah Levin is the Co-Chair of the NISO KBART Standing Committee and a member of the KBART Automation Working Group. Noah has spent the last 20 years designing and creating metadata workflows for large Academic and Trade Publishers; managing their Link Resolver/Discovery data, MARC... Read More →
AJ

Andree J. Rathemacher

Professor Librarian, University of Rhode Island
Andrée Rathemacher is Head of Acquisitions at the University of Rhode Island, where she administers the materials budget and is responsible for the purchase and licensing of library materials in all formats and the management of electronic resources. She is currently the co-Chair... Read More →
avatar for Stephanie Doellinger

Stephanie Doellinger

Senior Metadata Operations Manager CI & KB, OCLC, Inc.
Stephanie Doellinger is a Senior Metadata Operations Manager at OCLC. Over her 10-year tenure, she and her team have worked with both publishers and libraries to manage the processing and validation of e-resource metadata which make up the WorldCat knowledge base and Central Index... Read More →
avatar for Athena Hoeppner

Athena Hoeppner

Discovery Services Librarian, University of Central Florida
Athena Hoeppner is the Discovery Services Librarian at the University of Central Florida, in Orlando, Florida. Her career in academic libraries spans 25 years with roles in public services, systems, and technical services. In her current role, she jointly oversees the eResources lifecycle... Read More →
avatar for Robert Heaton

Robert Heaton

Collection Management Librarian, Utah State University - Merrill-Cazier Library
Looking for answers: How will we keep paying for all this stuff? How are we going to archive all this digital stuff? How can we align author incentives, the publishing marketplace, and the future of the scholarly record? When will libraries benefit from well-designed free software... Read More →
avatar for Tony Alves

Tony Alves

Scholarly Publishing Free Agent, @OccupySTM
Thirty years of scholarly publishing experience including product development, software design, content acquisition, international client management, organization building and business development. In depth understanding of all aspects of the publishing process, particularly related... Read More →


Tuesday February 23, 2021 2:00pm - 3:00pm EST
Room 1

6:30pm EST

Social Hour: Art and Conversation
Click the Video Stream link to join us, and the password is NISOPlus21


Join us in our Gather.town space for conversation with new and old friends, as well as a selection of art and artists from Baltimore, the hometown of NISO!

Moderators
avatar for Jason Griffey

Jason Griffey

Director of Strategic Initiatives, NISO
Jason Griffey is the Director of Strategic Initiatives at NISO, where he works to identify new areas of the information ecosystem where standards expertise is useful and needed, and leads ongoing projects such as NISO’s participation in the Coalition for Seamless Access. Prior to joining NISO... Read More →
avatar for Kimberly Graham

Kimberly Graham

Office Manager, National Information Standards Organization


Tuesday February 23, 2021 6:30pm - 7:45pm EST
Gather.Town

8:00pm EST

What has 2020 taught us about the information ecosystem?
NISO Discourse Discussion for this session
https://discourse.niso.org/t/what-has-2020-taught-us-about-the-information-ecosystem-fragility-and-resilience/91

The impact of the COVID19 pandemic and the Black Lives Matter protests in 2020 were (and continue to be) felt all around the world — including the information world: the rapid shift to online learning; the dramatic increase in the use of digital resources; the challenges of working from home; budget and hiring cuts and freezes. Which of these changes — and more — will be permanent? What will the information community look like five or ten years from now? The lessons we learn will help us better understand the fragility or resilience of our organizations and structures, our processes and policies. This session includes perspectives from librarians, publishers, and vendors from around the world about what their experiences in 2020 have taught them.

Moderators
avatar for Robert Boissy

Robert Boissy

Director, Account Development, Springer Nature
I have had various roles in scholarly publishing since 2003, and fifteen years as a subscription agent before that. I have library degrees from the University at Albany and Syracuse University. I like to talk about cooperative marketing projects between libraries and publishers... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Oya Rieger

Oya Rieger

Senior Strategist, Ithaka S+R
avatar for Stephanie Dawson

Stephanie Dawson

CEO, ScienceOpen
Content in context is our goal at ScienceOpen. We provide publishing and metadata services embedded within an interactive discovery environment with a focus on preprints, open peer review, and community curation.
avatar for Sandy Hirsh

Sandy Hirsh

Associate Dean for Academics, San Jose State University
Dr. Sandra Hirsh is Associate Dean for Academics in the College of Professional and Global Education at San José State University. She previously served as Professor and Director of the School of Information at San José State University for ten years from 2010-2020. Prior to joining... Read More →
avatar for Mohamed Baessa

Mohamed Baessa

Manager, Preservation and Digital Services, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology
avatar for Peter Simon

Peter Simon

Vice President, Product Management, NewsBank, Inc
Peter Simon is Vice President, Product Management at NewsBank, inc. He directs the development of key products while working on numerous strategic initiatives important to the growth of the company.Simon began his career as an Editor at RR Bowker; progressed to Executive Vice President... Read More →
avatar for Clarissa West-White

Clarissa West-White

Reference Instructor/Research Librarian, Bethune Cookman University
avatar for Christopher Chan

Christopher Chan

Deputy University Librarian, Hong Kong Baptist University
I worked in Information Services at HKBU Library for over 12 years. Prior to that, I was a school librarian at two international schools in Hong Kong.In February 2021 I was appointed Deputy University Librarian. In this role I provide leadership and management for all of the Library's... Read More →
avatar for C K Ramaiah

C K Ramaiah

Professor, University of Pondicherry


Tuesday February 23, 2021 8:00pm - 9:15pm EST
Room 2
  Global Perspectives
  • Host Organization NISO

8:00pm EST

AI, metadata creation, and historical bias
NISO Discourse Discussion for this session
https://discourse.niso.org/t/ai-metadata-creation-and-historical-bias/92

Much has been written about the dangers of bias — conscious and unconscious — in the creation of artificial intelligence.  Our speakers will share their thoughts on the challenges of metadata creation for and by AI, and how standards and best practices can help address them.

Moderators
avatar for Karim Boughida

Karim Boughida

Dean, Universities Libraries, URI

Speakers
avatar for Dominique Luster

Dominique Luster

Teenie Harris Archivist, Carnegie Museum of Art
Dominique is the Teenie Harris Archivist at the Carnegie Museum of Art. Previously she worked as Liaison Librarian at the University of Pittsburgh focusing on serving at-risk undergraduates, and promoting advanced research at the undergraduate level.
avatar for Michelle Urberg

Michelle Urberg

Affiliate Associate, Maverick Publishing Specialists
avatar for Joris van Rossum

Joris van Rossum

Director, Research Integrity, International STM Association
Joris van Rossum leads STM’s research integrity and data programs - both integral components of STM’s mission to advance trusted research.


Tuesday February 23, 2021 8:00pm - 9:15pm EST
Room 1
  NFAIS Futures
  • Host Organization NISO

9:30pm EST

Privacy: global perspectives
NISO Discourse Discussion for this session
https://discourse.niso.org/t/privacy-global-perspectives/94

Thinking with GDPR (Andrew Cormack)

Europe's General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is sometimes portrayed as a complicated obstruction to doing what we want. This talk will look at the law behind the slogans: finding a rich source of guidance on how to develop the effective, privacy-respecting services that our customers and users - not just in Europe - need and expect. We'll look at the principles of Accountability, Necessity, Purpose Limitation and Information, and show how these help us design services that work better for users and providers. Specific examples will be taken from access management and data analytics.
mHealth Wearables and Apps: A changing privacy landscape (Christine Suver)
The use of wearables and smartphone apps to collect health-related data (mHealth) is a growing field. Wearable and health apps can continuously monitor our physical activity, sleep, heart rate, glucose levels, etc. They provide a rich data set that can supplement the data from occasional doctor's visit. But what are the privacy considerations of mHealth? We will explore global privacy principles, discuss the tension between anonymity and data utility, and propose ways to improve privacy notices/policies.


A look at China’s draft Personal Information Protection Law (Judy Bai)

With measures to ensure privacy getting prioritized worldwide, many countries have framed relevant laws and regulations on personal information protection. On October 21, 2020, China released its draft Personal Information Protection Law (PIPL) for public consultation.
When the draft PIPL gets passed, it’ll be China’s central and universal governing law on protecting personal information. While no definitive timeline has been set for the final law, we discuss some of the key features of this important piece of draft legislation and how businesses (based in China and those engaged in commercial interactions with people living in China) should prepare ahead to ensure data privacy compliance.

Moderators
avatar for Christopher Chan

Christopher Chan

Deputy University Librarian, Hong Kong Baptist University
I worked in Information Services at HKBU Library for over 12 years. Prior to that, I was a school librarian at two international schools in Hong Kong.In February 2021 I was appointed Deputy University Librarian. In this role I provide leadership and management for all of the Library's... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Andrew Cormack

Andrew Cormack

Chief Regulatory Adviser, Jisc
Andrew Cormack has worked for the UK's national research and education network for more than twenty years. He joined as Head of the Computer Emergency Response Team, but for the past fifteen years has focussed on policy and regulatory issues. His role has expanded from networks to... Read More →
avatar for Christine Suver

Christine Suver

Director Research Governance and Ethics, Sage Bionetworks
I lead the Research Governance and Ethics group at Sage Bionetworks. The group develops and pilots data sharing models and tools to enable open research collaborations.In my work, I help research participants and researchers determine the appropriate governance approach to contribute... Read More →
avatar for Judy Bai

Judy Bai

Director of Business Development, Digital Science
Judy Bai is an expert in scholarly communications as well as research workflow tools and data in China. She is currently Director of Business Development, China for Digital Science, where she is responsible for shaping the company’s Greater China strategy and delivering its products... Read More →


Tuesday February 23, 2021 9:30pm - 10:45pm EST
Room 1
  NFAIS Futures
  • Host Organization NISO

9:30pm EST

Preservation of new media - roles and responsibilities
NISO Discourse Discussion for this session
https://discourse.niso.org/t/preservation-of-new-media-roles-and-responsibilities/93

The digitalization of research has resulted in the development of many new types of media. How can we ensure that they're adequately preserved for future generations? What new tools and services will be needed? Who should be responsible? Two digital preservation experts will share their views on this important topic.

Moderators
WQ

Wendy Queen

Director, Johns Hopkins University Press

Speakers
avatar for Mark Graham

Mark Graham

Director, the Wayback Machine, Internet Archive
I would like to connect with people about how to make the web more useful and reliable. With a focus on archiving born digital content.
avatar for Dr Heather Ruland Staines

Dr Heather Ruland Staines

Independent Consultant, Independent Consultant
The future of scholarly communications, anything open, digital preservation, journal transfer, karaoke and dogs!


Tuesday February 23, 2021 9:30pm - 10:45pm EST
Room 2
  NISO Now
  • Host Organization NISO
 
Wednesday, February 24
 

10:00am EST

Digital Humanities
NISO Discourse Discussion for this session
https://discourse.niso.org/t/digital-humanities/96

The Digital Humanities community is one of the most active in the information standards world — from supporting good metadata and standardized taxonomies to data preservation, and so much more! This panel brings together digital humanities experts from South Africa, the UK, and the US to discuss when, how, and why they use standards in their work, and what improvements and additions are needed.

Moderators
avatar for Clifford Anderson

Clifford Anderson

Associate University Librarian, Vanderbilt University

Speakers
avatar for Katrina Fenlon

Katrina Fenlon

Assistant Professor, University of Maryland College of Information Studies
KB

Keith Breckenridge

The Wits Institute for Social and Economic Research


Wednesday February 24, 2021 10:00am - 11:15am EST
Room 3
  Global Perspectives
  • Host Organization NISO

10:00am EST

Controlled digital lending and new models of sharing
NISO Discourse Discussion for this session
https://discourse.niso.org/t/controlled-digital-lending-and-new-models-of-sharing/98

Everyone is painfully aware of the degree to which copyright law in the United States hasn't kept pace with the modern digital world, and how existing standards may or may not "fit" well with digital goods. Especially this past year, digital lending in libraries has been pushed to its limits and, some would say, beyond.

Join Kyle and Carlo for a discussion about these limits, the new model of Controlled Digital Lending, and ask questions of the experts. 

Speakers
avatar for Kyle K. Courtney

Kyle K. Courtney

Copyright Advisor, Harvard University
Kyle K. Courtney is a lawyer and librarian, serving as the Copyright Advisor at Harvard University, working out of Harvard Library’s Office for Scholarly Communication.  He works closely with the Harvard community to establish a culture of shared understanding of copyright issues... Read More →
avatar for Oya Rieger

Oya Rieger

Senior Strategist, Ithaka S+R
avatar for Carlo Scollo Lavizzari

Carlo Scollo Lavizzari

Advocate, Lenz Caemmerer
Carlo Scollo Lavizzari, is a lawyer qualified in South Africa, England & Wales, and Switzerland. Carlo specializes in intellectual property protection and by now has more than 18 years of work experience with law firms in Africa, Europe, Switzerland and the United States of America... Read More →


Wednesday February 24, 2021 10:00am - 11:15am EST
Room 1
  NFAIS Futures
  • Host Organization NISO

10:00am EST

Metrics and measures: the Public Library Data Alliance
NISO Discourse Discussion for this session
https://discourse.niso.org/t/metrics-and-measures-the-public-library-data-alliance/95

The Public Library Data Alliance (PLDA) is the implementing organization of the Measures that Matter project (https://measuresthatmatter.net/) and seeks to operationalize the goals of that project, primarily to "collaboratively develop and implement a National Action Plan that will allow libraries to more effectively turn data into useable information to demonstrate the value of library collections and services nation-wide."

Come join some of the founding members of the PLDA in a discussion of the project and to help determine the areas of needed focus in this area. 

Speakers
avatar for Todd Carpenter

Todd Carpenter

Executive Director, NISO
Wine, food, wine, Standards, running, wine, food, wine.http://orcid.org/0000-0002-8320-0491


Wednesday February 24, 2021 10:00am - 11:15am EST
Room 2
  NISO Now
  • Host Organization NISO

10:00am EST

A focus on accessibility
NISO Discourse Discussion for this session
https://discourse.niso.org/t/a-focus-on-accessibility/97

Why are organizations continuing to be blind to accessibility?
When we see a person struggling in a wheelchair to navigate a curb with no ramp, we get frustrated and help the person out. In most cases we don't see people who are struggling to read digital content and therefore the issue is not as obvious to the public. It is not until a lawsuit has been filed that the public hears about the persistent issues around digital content accessibility. Even today, we have organizations that have not addressed accessibility to make digital content available to the sight impaired. Why are businesses and organizations still blind to accessibility and what can they do to become compliant?

The evolution of accessibility: upgrading the experience for all users
From learning disorders to reading disorders to hearing, visual, and physical impairments, how do we ensure that every user is able to use the library to its fullest potential? This session will discuss the needs of ALL users, and answer a range of questions: How should digital services support the different kinds of accessibility requirements? How do we make all aspects of library systems equally available to all users by adhering to accessibility standards and usability best practices? How do we actually comprehend our users’ accessibility needs in the first place? And how do we keep our services continuously up-to-date in order to meet our users’ accessibility needs as we deploy new tools in our libraries?

Looking for an accessible open science: overcoming barriers within SciELO Network 
People with disabilities and / or the elderly, who currently represent 45% of the world population, especially those associated with Higher Education and research institutions, have reported significant difficulties in guaranteeing their rights to accessible information. Therefore, it is important to portray the current situation of accessibility in the interfaces of the SciELO Brazil collection and in their respective digital assets. In light of this objective, an accessibility assessment was carried out on the SciELO Network website pages. The results indicated absences of: alternative text for images; link labels; page language indication; among others. Considering 82,716 (19.5%) scientific articles from 9,045 volumes published between 2017 and 2020, 205,921 figures and 173,976 tables were prospected. Although 95.05% of the tables are encoded in HTML (98.29% with descriptive labels and 98.18% with captions), none of the analyzed articles presented essential elements for the transmission of information to assistive technologies. This scenario highlights the need to adopt standards to promote accessibility in all stages of the flow of production and dissemination of knowledge.

Moderators
avatar for Suze Kundu

Suze Kundu

Head of Public Engagement, Digital Science
A nanochemist with a passion for public engagement, I've been at Digital Science since 2018, having left lab life behind to help support a more open and efficient research community.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Johnson

Michael Johnson

Director, Content Partnerships, Benetech
avatar for Barry Bealer

Barry Bealer

Senior Vice President, Strategic Alliances, codemantra
RS

Rob Smith

Platform Product Manager, Accessibility, EBSCO Information Services
BH

Bruce Howell

Accessibility Services Manager, The Carroll Center for the Blind
avatar for Solange Santos

Solange Santos

Production and Publishing Coordinator, SciELO
MC

Mike Caprara

Chief Information Officer, The Viscardi Center


Wednesday February 24, 2021 10:00am - 11:15am EST
Room 4
  Track 4
  • Host Organization NISO

11:30am EST

The importance of diversity, equity, and inclusion in the information ecosystem
NISO Discourse Discussion for this session
https://discourse.niso.org/t/the-importance-of-diversity-equity-and-inclusion-in-the-information-ecosystem/101

In Pursuit of DEI in a Complex Landscape
Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI) has become an important topic across our community. In this session we will discuss how this affects us as organizations, individually and as a community. We will start with short presentations where each panel member discusses the approach of their organization to implementing and promoting DEI. We finish off with a hopefully lively discussion with the audience around concerns, issues and the responsibility that each of us has. We also hope to identify gaps and opportunities for collaborative approaches.

Central to the discussion is the understanding that while each library has their own approach to DEI, Ex Libris takes a holistic approach to its DEI efforts by focusing on commitments within three areas: employment practices, community relations, and its services and products. A key part of the approach is the recognition that employees and industry partners are central to ensuring the organization designs, builds and maintains products that serve everyone equally. The Ex Libris presentation will give a focus on the collaboration with the community a key factor in the development of products that are developed and created for all.

More details to follow

Moderators
avatar for Suze Kundu

Suze Kundu

Head of Public Engagement, Digital Science
A nanochemist with a passion for public engagement, I've been at Digital Science since 2018, having left lab life behind to help support a more open and efficient research community.

Speakers
avatar for Allen Jones

Allen Jones

Director, Digital Library & Technical Services, The New School
avatar for Judith Fraenkel

Judith Fraenkel

Director of Product Management, Ex Libris
Judith Fraenkel is Director of Product Management at Ex Libris. Since joining the company in 1999, Judith has filled various positions in the areas of technology, content management, and customer support. A key focus of her current role is dedicated to leading strategy and programs... Read More →
avatar for Rebecca McLeod

Rebecca McLeod

Managing Director, Harvard Data Science Review
Rebecca McLeod is the Managing Director for the Harvard Data Science Review (HDSR, the open access platform of the Harvard Data Science Initiative. In this role, she oversees all business, publishing and program operations of HDSR including business development, production and editorial... Read More →


Wednesday February 24, 2021 11:30am - 12:45pm EST
Room 3
  Global Perspectives
  • Host Organization NISO

11:30am EST

Lightning talks: projects and products
NISO Discourse Discussion for this session
https://discourse.niso.org/t/lightning-talks-projects-and-products/100

In this session, presenters will have five minutes to share an elevator pitch for their product or project. Afterwards, the audience will have the opportunity to both ask questions to better understand the projects, and will also be able to suggest tools that they would like to see in the information ecosystem.

Moderators
avatar for Jonathan Clark

Jonathan Clark

Managing Agent, The DOI Foundation

Speakers
avatar for Allen Jones

Allen Jones

Director, Digital Library & Technical Services, The New School
avatar for Christina Emery

Christina Emery

Senior marketing manager, open access books, Springer Nature Ltd
Christina Emery is senior marketing manager for Palgrave Macmillan’s and Springer’s open access books programmes at Springer Nature. She studied French with German at the University of Leeds and went on to work for the European Patent Office in Munich. Before her role at Springer... Read More →
avatar for Jason Priem

Jason Priem

cofounder, Our Research
Jason Priem is a cofounder of Our Research, the nonprofit behind Unpaywall and the Unsub data dashboard. As an Information Science PhD student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Jason helped create the field of altmetrics--coining the term, authoring the influential... Read More →
avatar for Yvonne Campfens

Yvonne Campfens

Executive director OA Swtichboard, OA Switchboard
Collaborative, industry-wide initiatives. More specifically: the OA Switchboard.Yvonne Campfens has over 25 years in publishing and related service sectors, with a Masters in applied econometrics from University of Amsterdam (1993). Early in her career she held a publishing position... Read More →
avatar for Eleonora Presani

Eleonora Presani

Executive Director, arXiv - Cornell Tech
Product Leader with a passion for knowledge. I'm bringing the experience of product development to arXiv with the mission of supporting open science, reproducibility and collaboration.I am specially passionate about delivering the right information at the right time, leveraging the... Read More →


Wednesday February 24, 2021 11:30am - 12:45pm EST
Room 1
  NFAIS Futures
  • Host Organization NISO

11:30am EST

Metadata and discovery
NISO Discourse Discussion for this session
https://discourse.niso.org/t/metadata-and-discovery/102

What You Can Do to Help Promote Transparency in Discovery -- and Why
NISO recently updated the Open Discovery Initiative Recommended Practice (https://www.niso.org/publications/rp-19-2020-odi), which outlines best practices for working with library discovery services. It defines ways for libraries to assess the level of content provider participation; streamlines the process by which libraries, content providers and discovery service providers work together; defines models for “fair” linking; and suggests usage statistics that should be collected for libraries and for content providers. The recommendations in this document, created by members of the Open Discovery Initiative Standing Committee, enable libraries, discovery service providers, and content providers to work together to the full extent of their abilities—providing the most effective and rich experience to end users.

In this presentation, you will learn about the Open Discovery Initiative, what changes were included in the 2020 revision of the ODI Recommended Practice, and delve more deeply into several areas: free-to-read content, fair linking, and the key elements included in the newly added library conformance statements.

Better metadata makes a difference
Libraries create, ingest and use metadata for a variety of purposes and activities, including supporting end user discovery of resources and collections. In order to successfully facilitate resource discovery, librarians must ensure that the metadata in their systems and discovery layers is standardised, accurate and as complete as possible; otherwise, their collections can be rendered essentially invisible to the user.
 
In order to improve metadata visibility and quality, librarians need initial and continuing technical training. Dr Diane Pennington will discuss how she provides training in metadata, cataloguing, and library systems in the MSc Information & Library Studies course at the University of Strathclyde’s iSchool. She will also provide an overview of her students’ broad range of applied and theoretical metadata research in order to illustrate the need for critically-informed, evidence-based metadata practice and implementation.
 
You will then hear from Emma Booth about the National Acquisitions Group Quality of Shelf-Ready Metadata Project, which collected data from UK academic libraries about their experiences with vendor-produced metadata for books and e-books. This case study serves to illustrate how poor quality metadata has a genuinely negative impact upon libraries and their users. It also demonstrates that the development and adoption of standards related to metadata quality is in the interests of everyone involved in the supply and use of library content because all stakeholders in the supply chain stand to benefit from ‘better’ richer metadata that can effectively bridge the gaps between information and communities.



Moderators
avatar for Peter Murray

Peter Murray

Open Source Community Advocate, Index Data, LLC
Peter Murray is the Open Source Community Advocate at Index Data, a software development and consulting enterprise with expertise in networked information retrieval and management based on open standards. He received an MLIS from Simmons College and a Bachelor of Science degree in... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Diane Pennington

Diane Pennington

Senior Lecturer in Info Science & CILIP MDG Chair, University of Strathclyde
I am a Senior Lecturer (Associate Professor) in Information Science and the Course Director of the MSc in Information & Library Studies at the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow, Scotland. I teach information organisation, library cataloguing, and library systems. As the leader... Read More →
avatar for Ken Varnum

Ken Varnum

Senior Program Manager, University of Michigan
I am the Senior Program Manager at the University of Michigan Library. In this role, I am responsible for three programs: Library Search, the U-M Library discovery interface, delivery interfaces, and the library's evolving and emerging analytics infrastructure.
avatar for Geoff Morse

Geoff Morse

Interim Head of Research Services, Northwestern University Libraries
avatar for Emma Booth

Emma Booth

E-Resources Metadata Specialist, University of Manchester Library
As a metadata specialist and cataloguer based in the UK, I'm passionate about the creation, curation and management of descriptive metadata for library resources, with the ultimate goal of supporting library-users with online discovery and access to collections. My day-to-day work... Read More →


Wednesday February 24, 2021 11:30am - 12:45pm EST
Room 4
  NFAIS Futures
  • Host Organization NISO

11:30am EST

Relationship between infrastructure, protocols, standards
NISO Discourse Discussion for this session
https://discourse.niso.org/t/relationship-between-infrastructure-protocols-standards/99

Research protocols and information standards have much in common, and both are essential components of research infrastructure. Protocols outline the process for a specific experiment or research project, while standards provide technical best practices for processes across the whole information ecosystem.  In this session, representatives from a publisher, a protocols platform, and an infrastructure organization will discuss their perspectives on the relationships between each — what's working, what isn't, and what more is needed?

Moderators
KR

Ken Rawson

Director Platform Dev. & New Initiatives, IEEE

Speakers
avatar for Adrian Burton

Adrian Burton

Director of Services, Policy, Collections, ARDC - Australian Research Data Commons
Adrian Burton is Director of Services, Policy, Collections with the Australian Research Data Commons, and has many years experience building and supporting national data policy, infrastructure, and services.
DC

David Crotty

Editorial Director, Journals Policy, Oxford University Press
David Crotty is the Editorial Director, Journals Policy for Oxford University Press. He oversees journal policy and contributes to strategy across OUP’s journals program, drives technological innovation, and serves as an information officer. David previously managed a suite of research... Read More →
avatar for Emma Ganley

Emma Ganley

Director of Strategic Initiatives, protocols.io
Emma obtained a PhD from the MRC-LMB in Cambridge in the UK, followed by a postdoc at UC Berkeley. Prior to joining protocols.io, Emma was the Chief Editor of PLOS Biology and worked in scientific publishing for 15 years. During this time she gained an enthusiasm for open data, preprints... Read More →


Wednesday February 24, 2021 11:30am - 12:45pm EST
Room 2
  NISO Now
  • Host Organization NISO

1:00pm EST

NISO Awards
The Ann Marie Cunningham Service award was established in 1994 to honor NFAIS members who routinely went above and beyond the normal call of duty to serve the organization. It is named after Ann Marie Cunningham who, while working with abstracting and information services such as Biological Abstracts and the Institute for Scientific Information, worked tirelessly as a dedicated NFAIS volunteer. She ultimately served as the NFAIS Executive Director  from 1991 to 1994 when she died unexpectedly. NISO is pleased to continue to present this award to honor NISO volunteers who have shown the same sort of commitment to serving our organization.

Starting in 1983, NFAIS honored individuals who made significant contributions to NFAIS, and subsequently retired from the information services field, by granting them a lifetime membership of the organization. NISO has also occasionally recognized individuals who have made significant contributions to our organization by honoring them in this way, and will continue to do so.

Join us to find out who is honored with these awards!

Speakers
avatar for Todd Carpenter

Todd Carpenter

Executive Director, NISO
Wine, food, wine, Standards, running, wine, food, wine.http://orcid.org/0000-0002-8320-0491


Wednesday February 24, 2021 1:00pm - 1:30pm EST
Plenary
  All Conference
  • Host Organization NISO

1:30pm EST

Miles Conrad Award
NISO Discourse Discussion for this session
https://discourse.niso.org/t/miles-conrad-award-2021/163

Miles Conrad was the founder of the National Federation of Abstracting and Indexing Services (NFAIS), and this award was established in 1965, in his memory. During the 1960s, Conrad encouraged NFAIS members — scholarly societies and government agencies — to work collaboratively in support of the space exploration program, in order to enhance the speed with which scientific knowledge could be disseminated, discovered, and acted upon. In the years that followed, NFAIS expanded its cross-disciplinary membership and played an important role in the development of online information services and resources, before merging with National Information Standards Organization (NISO) in 2019. NISO’s vision, of a world where all can benefit from the unfettered exchange of information, reflects the aims of both organizations; in awarding this prize, we are proud to continue recognizing the contributions of those whose lifetime achievements have moved our community forward.

Miles Conrad Award recipients

Speakers
avatar for Heather Joseph

Heather Joseph

Executive Director, Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition
Heather Joseph has served as the Executive Director of the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC) since 2005. In that capacity, she works to support broadening access to the results of scholarly research through enabling open access publishing, archiving and... Read More →


Wednesday February 24, 2021 1:30pm - 2:30pm EST
Plenary
  All Conference
  • Host Organization NISO

2:45pm EST

Virtual cocktails/mocktails social hour
Click the Video Stream link to join us, and the password is NISOPlus21

Join us for conversation and drinks in our digital social space in gather.town! Meet old friends and new acquaintances, and, thanks to sponsorship by Crossref, enjoy a cocktail/mocktail specially created for us by professional mixologist, Arielle JohnsonThe NISO Fizz!

 

Wednesday February 24, 2021 2:45pm - 4:00pm EST
Gather.Town

8:00pm EST

Open versus proprietary in software and systems
NISO Discourse Discussion for this session
https://discourse.niso.org/t/open-versus-proprietary-in-software-and-systems/104

Opening the ILS/LSP: Steps Towards a Fully Customizable Infrastructure: 
"Library Systems and services are at a point where they can be refined to meet the unique goals and needs of specific institutions. In spite of these impressive capabilities, library systems sometimes lack the flexibility afforded by the full interoperability across multiple libraries, vendors, and platforms necessary to ensure peak performance.

The traditional centerpiece of our systems environment, the ILS or LSP, is at a crossroads between allowing the kinds of systems interplay libraries need and the barriers created by contractual issues, technical barriers, and closed infrastructure. This session will highlight specific integration and interoperability concerns with commentary from members of the university, consortia, and vendor communities. The session will also emphasize the benefits of open systems for libraries and vendors, and how NISO could play a role by considering applicable standards through a dedicated working group."

Expediting Access with a Browser Add-on: Open Source vs. Commercial Approach : 
(Bohyun Kim)
"Providing quick and easy access to the library’s paid resources for researchers has been an ongoing challenge for libraries. One attractive means to achieve this is a web browser add-on, because it has the advantage of being available exactly when and where scholars and researchers spot and try to obtain the full-text content of research materials while online.

LibX, a free and open-source browser add-on developed at the Virginia Tech in 2005, was widely adopted and used by many libraries for more than a decade. But recently it has become defunct due to the lack of development efforts and general support from the wide library community. Now, some libraries have started licensing and implementing commercial products instead. Even though these commercial add-ons and LibX all aim to facilitate and expedite access, there are some distinct differences in their approaches.

In this session, I will (a) explore those differences in the open-source vs the commercial approach, drawing examples from LibX and Lean Library and (b) discuss what may be the ideal user interface design and the feature set for a browser extension that meets the users’ research needs, delivers great user experience, and advances the library’s goal at the same time."

Moderators
avatar for Leslie Johnston

Leslie Johnston

Director of Digital Preservation, National Archives

Speakers
avatar for Russell Palmer

Russell Palmer

Assistant Director, GALILEO Support Services, GALILEO
Russell Palmer is an assistant director at GALILEO, where he is in charge of the support services team. He and his team work on the development of GALILEO, new intergrations (such as OpenAthens), sand ystem report requests. Prior to GALILEO, Palmer worked at LYRASIS for 14 years in... Read More →
avatar for Brooks Travis

Brooks Travis

Library IT Coordinator, Missouri State University
avatar for Bohyun Kim

Bohyun Kim

CTO, URI
Bohyun Kim is the Chief Technology Officer and an Associate Professor at the University of Rhode Island Libraries. She is the author of three books, Moving Forward with Digital DisruptionUnderstanding Gamification, and Library Mobile Experience: Practices and User Expectati... Read More →
avatar for Erik Radio

Erik Radio

Metadata Librarian, University of Colorado at Boulder Libraries


Wednesday February 24, 2021 8:00pm - 9:15pm EST
Room 1
  NFAIS Futures
  • Host Organization NISO

8:00pm EST

An introduction to NISO
NISO Discourse Discussion for this session
https://discourse.niso.org/t/an-introduction-to-niso/76

Join us for an introduction to all things NISO! Curious about our work? Want to learn more about current Standards and other NISO projects? Join us for an introduction and to ask us questions.

Speakers
avatar for Nettie Lagace

Nettie Lagace

Associate Executive Director, NISO - National Information Standards Organization
Nettie Lagace is the Associate Executive Director at NISO, where she is responsible for facilitating the work of NISO's topic committees and development groups for standards and best practices, and working with the community to encourage broad adoption of this consensus work. Prior... Read More →
avatar for Todd Carpenter

Todd Carpenter

Executive Director, NISO
Wine, food, wine, Standards, running, wine, food, wine.http://orcid.org/0000-0002-8320-0491


Wednesday February 24, 2021 8:00pm - 9:15pm EST
Room 3

8:00pm EST

Standards in open research infrastructure: challenges and perspectives for global adoption
NISO Discourse Discussion for this session
https://discourse.niso.org/t/standards-in-open-research-infrastructure-challenges-and-perspectives-for-global-adoption/103

Standards are an essential component of open research infrastructure, enabling interoperability, increasing efficiencies, reducing errors, and improving user experience. In order to be truly effective, standards must be developed and implemented globally, but how? This panel of experts from Australia, Ireland, and Mexico will discuss the challenges for their communities, and identify opportunities for the information community to work together globally to address them.

Moderators
avatar for Natasha Simons

Natasha Simons

Associate Director, Data & Services, Australian Research Data Commons
Natasha Simons has her head in the clouds - literally, technically and figuratively. She loves research data and making good stuff happen. As Associate Director, Data & Services, at the Australian Research Data Commons she is responsible for programs that support the development of... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Ian Duncan

Ian Duncan

Director, Outreach, The Australian Research Data Commons
avatar for Arianna Becerril-Garcia

Arianna Becerril-Garcia

Professor, UAEM, Redalyc.org
avatar for Daniel Bangert

Daniel Bangert

National Open Research Coordinator, Digital Repository of Ireland, Royal Irish Academy
Dr Daniel Bangert is Ireland’s National Open Research Coordinator, based at the Digital Repository of Ireland, Royal Irish Academy. In this role he works with Ireland's National Open Research Forum (NORF) on the development and delivery of a National Action Plan for the implementation of open research across Ireland... Read More →


Wednesday February 24, 2021 8:00pm - 9:15pm EST
Room 2
  NISO Now
  • Host Organization NISO

9:30pm EST

Keynote: The Japan Science & Technology Agency's Moonshot Goal 1
NISO Discourse Discussion for this session
https://discourse.niso.org/t/keynote-the-japan-science-technology-agencys-moonshot-goal-1/105

This talk will introduce a challenging research program, the Japan Science & Technology Agency's Moonshot Goal 1 on “Realization of a society in which human beings can be free from limitations of body, brain, space, and time by 2050.” The program was determined by the Japanese Plenary session of Council for Science, Technology and Innovation (“CSTI”), the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (“MEXT”), and JST. It consists of three human-centered R&D projects on Cybernetic Avatars, which will support the creation of cloud infrastructure and core technologies that enable a diverse range of remotely operated social human activities. They will help us adapt and adjust to a new human-centered ‘cybernetic avatar life,’ where these avatars will augment the physical, cognitive, and perceptual capabilities of people from a range of socio-economic and other backgrounds. The cybernetic avatars will be developed from the viewpoint of not only of the providers, but also the users in future society. The project will also conduct basic research on human stress caused by the avatars — and how to relieve this — while taking into account ethical, legal, social, and economic (ELSE) issues.

 

Speakers
avatar for Dr Norihiro Hagita

Dr Norihiro Hagita

Japan Science & Technology Agency
Norihiro Hagita received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from Keio University, Japan in 1976, 1978, and 1986 respectively. From 1978 to 2001, he was with the Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation (NTT). He then joined the Advanced Telecommunications... Read More →


Wednesday February 24, 2021 9:30pm - 10:30pm EST
Plenary
  All Conference
  • Host Organization NISO
 
Thursday, February 25
 

10:00am EST

The essential nature of digital preservation
NISO Discourse Discussion for this session
https://discourse.niso.org/t/the-essential-nature-of-digital-preservation/108

In the Eye of the Beholder: What’s a Digital Preservation System Anyway? 
Cultural heritage organizations increasingly depend on digital platforms to support the curation, discovery, and long-term management of digital content. Yet, some of these systems and tools have been shown to have substantial sustainability challenges. The long-term stewardship of digital cultural materials depends not only on the technical resiliency of preservation systems, but on their financial and organizational sustainability. Funded by the Institute of Library and Museum Services (IMLS), Ithaka S+R is assessing how digital preservation systems are developed, deployed, and sustained through a series of case studies. We will share our initial findings related to design approaches of community-based and commercial digital preservation and curation initiatives, offer lessons learned, and propose alternative sustainability models for long-term maintenance and development. Although digital preservation is a well-established concept, it continues to be a situated and interpretive process, highly variable across different institutional settings. Rather than trying to adjudicate what does and does not “count” as digital preservation, we are studying the systems and services that cultural heritage organizations might use toward meeting digital preservation goals. In taking this broad approach, we hope to acknowledge the diversity of curatorial practices, priorities, and resource capacities that cultural heritage organizations bring to digital preservation work.

Addressing the pain in preservation
Almost everyone involved with digital information agrees that Digital preservation is a “good thing” and should be part of business as usual. However, implementing widespread preservation is often a very painful process… and many initiatives are stillborn. The pain points are many and varied (no resource; lack of trust; lack of understanding; poor interoperability; no connectivity to name but a few), but they’re also not new. These 20th century problems are all solvable - even more so now that we have access to 21st century technology.

And we intend to do just that… Well, to be more accurate, we intend use the hive mind of NISO attendees to map out pathways to solutions. Outlining the problems and then asking the fun questions. What could take away the pain? How? What need’s to be in place? What’s stopping us from doing it right now?

This session will start with a few short provocations to give a flavour of the problems and possible approaches to solving them. Then the discussion begins. Nothing is off limits. If you have a problem that needs a solution or a solution that’s looking for a problem to solve this is the session for you.

Moderators
avatar for Clarissa West-White

Clarissa West-White

Reference Instructor/Research Librarian, Bethune Cookman University

Speakers
avatar for Oya Rieger

Oya Rieger

Senior Strategist, Ithaka S+R
avatar for Paul Stokes

Paul Stokes

Product Manager, Jisc
Paul has had a varied career in both the commercial sector and academia (and all points in-between). At present,  he leads on preservation for Jisc's Preservation service [Preservation | Jisc] where he is currently referred to as a "Product Manager". He is a director of the Digi... Read More →


Thursday February 25, 2021 10:00am - 11:15am EST
Room 3
  Global Perspectives
  • Host Organization NISO

10:00am EST

Identifiers, metadata, and connections
NISO Discourse Discussion for this session
https://discourse.niso.org/t/identifiers-metadata-and-connections/106

A two-part session focusing on identifiers, metadata, and using them to make connections!

Part 1: Hocus pocus: Mixing open identifiers into metadata makes connections between research work
Journal articles don’t exist in a vacuum. There is increasing awareness of the need to reliably connect articles, data, affiliation, contributor and funding information to expose trends and opportunities in the research ecosystem, enable reliable streamlined reporting to key stakeholders and to ensure transparency and trust in research.
To support this, metadata for research objects can’t exist in a vacuum either. It needs to reflect these relationships and incorporate a range of persistent identifiers to do so. And it needs to be open so that it can populate through different systems. DataCite, ROR, Crossref and ORCID have been working together to look at how relationships are asserted between articles, data and other content types, and what connecting research objects to other identifiers helps us see: which outputs resulted from a research grant, which institutions are particularly strong in which areas, where and how are openly available data and software used, and who researchers are collaborating with. We can also use these existing relationships to infer further connections via tools like the PID Graph and the community can (re)use our open metadata to build new services and tools.

Join representatives from ORCID, DataCite, ROR and Crossref as we share the kind of information that’s already available, what work we still have to do and our plans to enhance this in collaboration with our communities."

Part 2: Data visualization
In a crowded digital media landscape the first question many authors, editors and publishers ask is, how can I make sure that my research is widely noticed and well understood? The answer, say Deb Wyatt and Donald Samulack of Cactus Communications, often lies in visualization.
As the research communication landscape changes, we continue to unlock more efficient and impactful ways to communicate research in highly visual and engaging ways. Video and graphical content formats are now core components of research publishing: just as important for the understanding of science and scholarship as published articles and monographs.
The second critical question is, how do we share research content reliably and accurately, in line with established community standards of rigor, ethics and integrity? As we embrace new formats for research communication, the challenge is to ensure that we continue to apply the same standards of rigor, transparency and FAIR principles to this derivative content.

Concluding this session, Dario Rodighiero will present his data visualization of ... NISO Plus 2021! He notes that, in sociology, the digital traces are these data that humans leave behind during daily activities. Open data and identifiers are not only instruments to make science more transparent and accessible, but they also represent a meaningful way to study the behavior of scientists. This talk aims to present how these digital traces can be used to observe the academic environment.

Moderators
avatar for Jonathan Clark

Jonathan Clark

Managing Agent, The DOI Foundation

Speakers
avatar for Rachael Lammey

Rachael Lammey

Head of Special Programs, Crossref
HC

Helena Cousijn

Director of Community Engagement, DataCite
avatar for Maria Gould

Maria Gould

Product Manager, California Digital Library
avatar for Donald Samulack

Donald Samulack

Head, Global Stakeholder Engagement, Cactus Communications
As Head, Global Stakeholder Engagement at Cactus Communications, I'm actively involved in supporting the publication needs of the academic and publishing communities, managing workflows across global time zones, and raising the level of awareness and professionalism of good publication... Read More →
avatar for Dario Rodighiero

Dario Rodighiero

Research Scholar, Harvard University, Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society
Dario is a research scholar at Harvard Metalab, a research unit dedicated to innovation in the arts and humanities and hosted at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society. The Swiss National Science Foundation granted him two consecutive fellowships.His capacity at the intersection of design, science, and humanities makes him comfortable in multiple disciplines. His education begins in theory and technology of communication, while his doctoral studies brought him to investigate the field... Read More →
avatar for Gabriela Mejias

Gabriela Mejias

Engagement Manager, ORCID
NISO Plus 2020 Scholarship Awardee
avatar for Deborah Wyatt

Deborah Wyatt

Vice President, Global Academic & Society Relations, Impact Science, a CACTUS brand


Thursday February 25, 2021 10:00am - 11:15am EST
Room 1
  NFAIS Futures
  • Host Organization NISO

10:00am EST

Quality and reliability of preprints
NISO Discourse Discussion for this session
https://discourse.niso.org/t/quality-and-reliability-of-preprints/107

Preprints have been growing in popularity and visibility across many disciplines and communities — all the more so during the COVID19 pandemic, with rapid publication of early research on everything from vaccine development to economic impacts. While preprints have been widely adopted in some disciplines, there are still concerns about their quality and reliability, especially when they can be readily accessed by policy-makers and the public who may not yet fully understand their limitiations. This session brings together three experts — from Africa, Latin America, and the US — to discuss the challenges and opportunities of preprints for researchers and non-researchers alike.

Moderators
avatar for Jabin White

Jabin White

VP of Content Management, ITHAKA
Jabin White is Vice President of Content Management for ITHAKA, an organization committed to helping the academic community use digital technologies to preserve the scholarly record and to advance research and teaching in sustainable ways. ITHAKA provides several services to the academic... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Kathryn Funk

Kathryn Funk

Technical Information Specialist, US National Library of Medicine/National Institutes of Health
Kathryn Funk is the program manager for PubMed Central at the US National Library of Medicine. She works on PMC policy and other special projects, including coordinating PMC support for the public access policies of numerous funding agencies. Prior to coming to NLM, Katie worked in... Read More →
avatar for Joy Owango

Joy Owango

Executive Director, Training Centre in Communication
Joy Owango is an experienced award-winning Founding Director with a demonstrated history of working in capacity support for early career researchers. She is skilled in Management, Business Strategy and Research Metrics. She is experienced in matters relating to Research Capacity... Read More →


Thursday February 25, 2021 10:00am - 11:15am EST
Room 2
  NISO Now
  • Host Organization NISO

10:00am EST

Open access and analytics
NISO Discourse Discussion for this session
https://discourse.niso.org/t/open-access-and-analytics/109

Next generation OA analytics: A case study 
A critical component in the development of sustainable funding models for OA is the ability to communicate impact in ways that are meaningful to a diverse range of internal and external stakeholders, including institutional partners, funders, and authors. While traditional paywall publishers can take advantage of industry standard COUNTER reports to communicate usage to subscribing libraries, no similar standard exists for OA content. Instead, many organizations are stuck with proxy metrics like sessions and page views that struggle to discriminate between robotic access and genuine engagement.

This session presents the results of an innovative project that builds on existing COUNTER metrics to develop more flexible reporting. Reporting goals include surfacing 3rd party engagement with OA content, the use of graphical report formats to improve accessibility, the ability to assemble custom data dashboards, and configurations that support the variant needs of diverse stakeholders. We’ll be sharing our understanding of who the stakeholders are, their differing needs for analytics, feedback on the reports shared, and lessons learned and areas for future research in this evolving area.

OA Book Metadata Standards to Support Usage Data Analytics 
This session will explore how current or new standards could address the challenges facing analytics that rely on the OA book usage data supply chain. Laura Ricci of Clarke & Esposito, co-author of the OA Book Supply Chain report produced with support from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for the global Exploring Open Access eBook Usage (OAeBU) data trust pilot project, will review the gaps and opportunities presented by the diversity of OA book stakeholders, open-access specific metadata elements and metadata standards. Lorraine Estelle, Director of Project COUNTER, and Brian O’Leary, Executive Director of the Book Industry Study Group, will then discuss how COUNTER and ONIX are positioned to address such issues in current or future releases. The session will conclude with all panelists reflecting upon where additional standards development may be needed.

Moderators
avatar for Michael Habib

Michael Habib

Product Director, Clarivate
Michael joined Clarivate at the beginning of 2017. Currently, as a Product Director for the Web of Science platform, Michael is focused on new product developments across the Web of Science suite including product strategy related to Open Research and funders. His team also looks... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Ms Lorraine Estelle

Ms Lorraine Estelle

Project Director, COUNTER
Lorraine Estelle is the COUNTER Project Director. Launched in March 2002, COUNTER is an international initiative serving librarians, publishers and intermediaries by setting standards that facilitate the recording and reporting of online usage statistics in a consistent, credible... Read More →
avatar for Brian O'Leary

Brian O'Leary

Executive Director, Book Industry Study Group
Brian O’Leary is executive director of the Book Industry Study Group, a U.S.-based trade association that disseminates information, creates and implements standards and conducts research to benefit the book publishing supply chain.Before being named to this role in 2016, O'Leary... Read More →
avatar for Tim Lloyd

Tim Lloyd

CEO, LibLynx
I specialize in Identity, Access, and Analytics for online resources. My business, LibLynx, provides cloud-based solutions to publishers, service providers and libraries to help them manage identity and access to online resources, and to better understand usage of those resources... Read More →
avatar for Sara Rouhi

Sara Rouhi

Director, Strategic Partnerships, Public Library of Science (PLoS)
Sara Rouhi is the Director of Strategic Partnerships at PLOS focusing on developing new business models for sustainable, inclusive open access publishing. In 2020 she launched PLOS first collective action business model for highly selective publishing, PLOS Community Action Publishing... Read More →
avatar for Laura Ricci

Laura Ricci

Consultant, Clarke & Esposito
Laura is a Consultant at Clarke & Esposito, a management consulting firm focused on strategic issues related to professional and academic publishing and information services. Prior to joining C&E, she worked at EBSCO Information Services as a Senior Product Manager for eBook channel... Read More →


Thursday February 25, 2021 10:00am - 11:15am EST
Room 4
  Track 4
  • Host Organization NISO

11:30am EST

Libraries and the importance of infrastructure
NISO Discourse Discussion for this session
https://discourse.niso.org/t/libraries-and-the-importance-of-infrastructure/112

Research begins and ends with the library
While journal publishing workflows reach the same ends whether inside of a library or a publishing house—namely, supporting research outputs—libraries are ideally positioned to enhance open research infrastructure by providing end-to-end service for researchers. Libraries already support institutional repositories and provide access to millions of titles; meanwhile librarians offer support for collecting, analyzing, and visualizing scholarly data sets. By publishing journals and other materials, libraries participate in another key part of the research lifecycle. Additionally, most library publishers follow the platinum open access publishing model (i.e., free of costs to both authors and readers), which can help amplify underrepresented voices in scholarly publishing.

Despite the benefits libraries can offer to researchers and societies by publishing their scholarship, challenges abound with building out the infrastructure for executing publishing workflows. The Library Publishing Coalition seeks to fill this gap by helping libraries develop, maintain, and improve publishing services, workflows, and infrastructure. At this point, library publishing is a work in progress, but the foundation has been laid, and libraries have the potential to be a formidable force in the open research movement by taking on the publishing of open access journals.

From creation to consumable knowledge: supporting research workflows in an open infrastructure
It goes without saying that the library fulfills a key role delivering those services to users in support of the acquisition and dissemination of knowledge. Certainly today, as humanity seeks to address some of its most pressing scientific challenges, open and reliable access to information takes center stage. Where and how then can the role of the library evolve to support research and speed the time from its creation to consumable, living knowledge?

This discussion will focus on ways in which libraries and vendors alike can support research in an open infrastructure. The presenter will look at researcher needs to conduct and share their work, while considering how the library – on its part – can best collect, preserve, disseminate and manage the research. Specific attention will be paid to open collaboration platforms in support of open science. And, the presenter will discuss how open source solutions as well may best support evolving needs for innovation in library workflows and the delivery of new services to users in support of research, teaching and learning.

Moderators
avatar for Sandy Hirsh

Sandy Hirsh

Associate Dean for Academics, San Jose State University
Dr. Sandra Hirsh is Associate Dean for Academics in the College of Professional and Global Education at San José State University. She previously served as Professor and Director of the School of Information at San José State University for ten years from 2010-2020. Prior to joining... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Michelle Urberg

Michelle Urberg

Affiliate Associate, Maverick Publishing Specialists
avatar for Christopher Spalding

Christopher Spalding

VP, Product, EBSCO
Christopher Spalding, VP of Product Management for Research Workflow Solutions at EBSCO Information Services, has spent most of his career working with systems for both research-level libraries and vendors in North America and Europe.  Before coming to EBSCO, Christopher managed... Read More →
avatar for Jody Bailey

Jody Bailey

Head of Scholarly Communications Office, Emory University
BL

Brandon Locke

Project Manager - Library Publishing Workflows, Educopia Institute


Thursday February 25, 2021 11:30am - 12:45pm EST
Room 3
  Global Perspectives
  • Host Organization NISO

11:30am EST

Misinformation and truth: from fake news to retractions to preprints
NISO Discourse Discussion for this session
https://discourse.niso.org/t/misinformation-and-truth-from-fake-news-to-retractions-to-preprints/111

Can open access play a role to fight fake news?
The subject of fake news is very topical. With social networks, and the advances of artificial intelligence, fake news are created and circulate faster and faster. Health and sciences are particularly nasty topics for fake news and the current context of Covid19 pandemic has made this crisis in the scientific information even more obvious.
Building on the results that were presented at the Open Science Conference 2020, a prototype that analyzes automatically open access research articles to help verify scientific claims was built.
This prototype takes a claim such as : “does coffee cause cancer ?” as an input, and builds three indicators to evaluate the truth behind this claim. The first indicator assesses whether the claim has been extensively studied. The second indicator is based on an NLP pipeline, and analyzes whether the articles generally agree or disagree with the claim. The third indicator is based on the retrieval and analysis of numerical values from the pertinent articles.
In this session, we would like to present our methodology, discuss the results that we have obtained and extend the discussion to the role that Open Access scholarly literature can play to fight false scientific claims and to help inform the public.

Connecting the dots: A cross-industry discussion on retracted research
Issues around the capturing, acknowledgement, classification, and tracking of retracted research are shared by academic institutions, publishing organizations, and the technology providers who support them. This cross-industry panel, moderated by a researcher and comprised of representatives from a non-profit publisher, an academic library, and a publishing platform provider, will examine shared obstacles and opportunities in processing, documenting, and communicating retractions, and will provide practical strategies for cross-industry collaboration. The panel will be moderated by Jodi Schneider, Assistant Professor, School of Information Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Jodi and other members of her research team have been spending significant time in 2020 bringing together representatives from all areas of the scholarly communication ecosystem as part of a Sloan-funded agenda-setting project. This moderated conversation will be one deliverable from a series of multiple workshops, interviews, and white papers.

Supporting sound and open science standards at the preprint stage
Preprint deposition and consumption has experienced exponential growth over the past year, particularly during the time of the COVID-19 pandemic. Problems with clarity, transparency, and reproducibility are pervasive in preprints and published articles alike. Given that preprints are often the earliest public-facing outputs of research, preprint platforms are in an ideal position to support, incentivize, and guide authors in the adoption of established standards for improving clarity, openness, and rigor in research reporting. This session discusses the misunderstanding and misrepresentation of some preprints during the pandemic and the unique role that preprint platforms can play in curbing disinformation and cultivating best practices at this critical point in the manuscript development process.

Moderators
avatar for Carolina Tanigushi

Carolina Tanigushi

Jr Visual Programmer, SciELO

Speakers
CB

Caitlin Bakker

Research Services Librarian, University of Minnesota
Caitlin Bakker is a health sciences librarian specializing in research support services, including systematic reviews, data management and reproducibility, scholarly publishing, and research impact assessment. She received her Masters in Library and Information Studies from McGill... Read More →
avatar for Jodi Schneider

Jodi Schneider

Assistant Professor, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Reducing the Inadvertent Spread of Retracted Science: Shaping a Research and Implementation Agenda https://infoqualitylab.org/projects/risrs2020/
avatar for Randy Townsend

Randy Townsend

Director, Publishing Operations, AGU
Randy Townsend, MPS, has worked for the American Geophysical Union for 15 years. His career focuses on the execution of the Publications Department's strategic goals, and the performance and development of an expanding portfolio of scholarly journals, requiring oversight of peer review operations... Read More →
avatar for Michele Avissar-Whiting

Michele Avissar-Whiting

Editor in Chief, Research Square
Michele is the Editor in Chief at Research Square, a preprint platform that launched at the end of 2018. Michele has been with Research Square for eight years, beginning as a Quality Control Editor on the AJE side of the business and then moving on to manage the Figure Formatting... Read More →
avatar for Hannah Heckner

Hannah Heckner

Product Strategist, Silverchair
Hannah Heckner has served as Product Strategist at Silverchair since the start of 2020. In this position she provides detailed product visioning, helps to prioritize and execute on the platform development plan, and oversees the Silverchair Universe program. She previously served... Read More →
avatar for Sylvain MASSIP

Sylvain MASSIP

CEO, Opscidia
Sylvain is a cofounder of Opscidia, a Paris-based start'up created in 2019 with the purpose of  simplying the reuse of the best of scientific literature for improving R&D, public decision-making, and access of the general public to sound scientific information. We believe that the... Read More →


Thursday February 25, 2021 11:30am - 12:45pm EST
Room 1
  NFAIS Futures
  • Host Organization NISO

11:30am EST

Knowledge bases and next steps: new and upcoming
NISO Discourse Discussion for this session
https://discourse.niso.org/t/knowledge-bases-and-next-steps-new-and-upcoming/110

NISO KBART Validator App 
How can we enhance trust in the quality of KBART files? Endorsement process is one way. Automated validation could be another way.

Content providers can have their KBART files endorsed by NISO. But the endorsement process consists of manual checks and thus can be a long process, with multiple file revisions and much back-and-forth communication required. The KBART Standing Committee aims to formalize and speed up its endorsement process by automating a number of validation tasks, thus providing more time to analyze parts of the files that are trickier to check automatically. Automated validation could also occur upstream, by content providers checking their KBART files post-production, or downstream, by knowledge bases checking KBART files before ingestion. What if all these scenarios relied on a shared tool?

The NISO KBART Validator app has two goals:
* Short term : ease NISO’s endorsement process by automating file checks that can be automated
* Long term : provide the community with a common validator app

The NISO KBART Validator app is currently under development. This session will provide a demo of the tool and insights about its roadmap. We want this app to be community powered: we’ll take time in this session to discuss where you and your organization could help, with or without developers."

The Package ID: Seeking Sanity through Standards
Content providers often bundle offerings into pre-set collections by subject, year, or some other scope so libraries can select packages that best fit their needs. Publishers also sell individual journals and books, allowing libraries to select content title-by-title. These options provide an effective approach to selling content. However, they produce a confusing, ever-changing tangle in knowledgebases.

Currently, package names are used identifiers, which introduces challenges for knowledgebase providers and librarians. Marketing pages, access platforms, licenses, invoices, and knowledgebases may all use different names for the same packages. Additionally, package names change, differ on various systems, and different bundles often have very similar names.

Knowledgebase providers load the content bundles to serve as the basis for discovery, linking, and ERM processes. Using package names as the identifier complicates always uniquely identify collections. The problem also affects automatic updates to the knowledgebase, in general, or within a specific library’s holdings. Likewise, librarians have a difficult time determining which of the many similar-sounding packages matches their licensed content.

Ultimately, all parties want to ensure that the licensed content is represented and enabled in knowledgebases for discovery and linking. Consistent unique identifiers may offer a way to improve efficiency and reduce confusion.

Moderators
avatar for Peter Murray

Peter Murray

Open Source Community Advocate, Index Data, LLC
Peter Murray is the Open Source Community Advocate at Index Data, a software development and consulting enterprise with expertise in networked information retrieval and management based on open standards. He received an MLIS from Simmons College and a Bachelor of Science degree in... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Christine Stohn

Christine Stohn

Dir Product Management, ProQuest (Ex Libris)
Christine Stohn is director of product management for discovery and delivery at Ex Libris. Christine has over 25 years of experience in the library and information industry, having worked on the content and data side before joining Ex Libris in 2001. In her current role Christine... Read More →
avatar for Ben Johnson

Ben Johnson

Provider Relations Engagement Manager, Ex Libris, a ProQuest Company
Ben has been working with content in the ProQuest/Serials Solutions products for over a decade, and Ex Libris products since their acquisition by ProQuest in late 2015. He has participated in all things KBART since 2012, including two years as former co-chair of the KBART Standing... Read More →
avatar for Athena Hoeppner

Athena Hoeppner

Discovery Services Librarian, University of Central Florida
Athena Hoeppner is the Discovery Services Librarian at the University of Central Florida, in Orlando, Florida. Her career in academic libraries spans 25 years with roles in public services, systems, and technical services. In her current role, she jointly oversees the eResources lifecycle... Read More →
avatar for Davin Baragiotta

Davin Baragiotta

IT Lead, Consortium Érudit
Davin is part of the KBART Standing Committee and is currently the main developer of the NISO KBART Validator app. He has worked for about 20 years in university cooperation and now leads the IT Team of Consortium Érudit, the leading digital dissemination platform of SSH research... Read More →


Thursday February 25, 2021 11:30am - 12:45pm EST
Room 2
  NISO Now
  • Host Organization NISO

11:30am EST

Data and analytics, outcomes and budgets
NISO Discourse Discussion for this session
https://discourse.niso.org/t/data-and-analytics-outcomes-and-budgets/113

Serials crisis: can data help treat this chronic condition?
When it comes to library budgets, there is an ever-widening gap between university budgets and library budgets, with library budgets continuing to shrink even when the university budgets may increase. This gap is neither new nor novel; but now in this era of a global pandemic, moves to online learning, unprecedented changes in higher education budgets, the problem is worse than ever and likely poised to accelerate at a rapid pace.

What may be different, however, is that today’s deep well of data can help stakeholders track down, understand, and respond to the challenge. But what data is most useful and how can we gather it?

In this session, we will take a global view from leading experts in both consortia and institutional libraries about data hunting and innovative ways data can be used to make the most of purchasing spend. Visibility into current pricing trends, including by discipline, business model and publisher helps inform the purchasing context. At-a-glance intelligence about business models and deals, as well as descriptions of emerging model and deal types, help early career professionals and senior staff alike keep current on this rapidly changing landscape.

We ask participants to come prepared to share experiences advocating for funding from institutions, as well as turning those dollars into access to the resources in demand by constituent academics and researchers.

Impact transparency: creating visibility into research outcomes
Impact and outcome measurement are major topics in the research community. Trillions of dollars are spent annually on research programs, yet far too many organizations still struggle to answer the basic questions: What was the overall impact of the funding on research and on the researchers’ careers? How do I link the research I funded or received to publications, patents, clinical trials and other outputs?

Why is it so hard to answer these questions?

While many research-oriented organizations aspire to operationalize their impact and outcome tracking and reporting, many are still reliant upon inadequate or incomplete datasets and management systems.

This talk will explore how advances in metadata, artificial intelligence, and open research infrastructure make it possible to create unprecedented transparency into outcomes from award to publication and beyond. Secondly, this discussion will describe how transparency into outcomes benefits the entire research ecosystem.

Leveraging years of grants management data, we’ll show graphically how funding organizations and research institutions can precisely identify outcomes – years after a grant has concluded as well as trace the arc of their researchers’ work from award to publication and beyond.

Moderators
avatar for Michael Habib

Michael Habib

Product Director, Clarivate
Michael joined Clarivate at the beginning of 2017. Currently, as a Product Director for the Web of Science platform, Michael is focused on new product developments across the Web of Science suite including product strategy related to Open Research and funders. His team also looks... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Curtis Brundy

Curtis Brundy

AUL Scholarly Communications and Collections, Iowa State University
I oversee collections and scholarly communications at Iowa State, which is a signatory of the OA2020 initiative. I am active with several groups that are interested in seeing, as well as assisting, scholarly publishers and societies transition to open business models.
avatar for Steve Pinchotti

Steve Pinchotti

CEO, Altum
Steve Pinchotti is Altum’s Chief Executive Officer. He is responsible for setting the strategic direction of the company and overseeing all aspects of the organization. With over twenty-five years of software development and implementation experience with organizations around the... Read More →
avatar for Shelley Allen

Shelley Allen

Head of Open Access, Emerald
I joined Emerald Publishing in March 2019 as Head of Open Research. With 19 years’ experience within academic publishing, working in mostly editorial roles across a range of subject disciplines I am passionate about driving change and ensuring real impact for the communities Emerald... Read More →


Thursday February 25, 2021 11:30am - 12:45pm EST
Room 4
  Track 4
  • Host Organization NISO

1:00pm EST

Keynote: What Does the Pandemic Teach us About Trust, Reliability and Information?
NISO Discourse Discussion for this session
https://discourse.niso.org/t/keynote-zeynep-tufekci/114

Dr. Tufekci is an associate professor at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill in the School of Information and Library Science, with an affiliate appointment in the Department of Sociology. She is also a faculty associate at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University. Currently a contributing writer at The Atlantic and the New York Times, she is also the author of Twitter and Tear Gas (Yale University Press). She studies the interaction between digital technology, artificial intelligence, and society, and has been widely lauded for her work on the societal challenges caused by the pandemic, using complex and systems-based thinking — the New York Times described her as, “Perhaps the only good amateur epidemiologist.” 


Speakers
avatar for Zeynep Tufekci

Zeynep Tufekci

Associate Professor, University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill
I am an associate professor at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill at at the School of Information and Library Science, a contributing opinion writer at the New York Times, and a faculty associate at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard Universi... Read More →


Thursday February 25, 2021 1:00pm - 2:00pm EST
Plenary
  All Conference
  • Host Organization NISO

2:00pm EST

Conference closing
Closing remarks and goodbyes

Thursday February 25, 2021 2:00pm - 2:30pm EST
Plenary
 
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